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Community Input Received by Planetary Science Decadal Survey

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AuthorInstitutionTitleSummaryPanel SelectionFileName
S. W. RuffArizona State UniversityLaboratory Studies in Support of Planetary Surface Composition InvestigationsThis paper demonstrates the need to support laboratory investigations related to the surface composition of planetary bodiesInner Planets – Mercury, Venus, and the Moon.

Mars – Not Phobos and Deimos.

Satellites – Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets.

Primitive Bodies – Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust.
Lab_Studies_Decadal_Survey_Surf_Comp_v2.doc
Robert SchinglerNASA Ames Research CenterROSI - Return on Science InvestmentA system for mission evaluation based on maximizing scienceNone of the above.ROSIv6.doc
Mark HofstadterJet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of TechnologyThe Atmospheres of the Ice Giants, Uranus and NeptuneWe believe many important atmospheric science questions can only be addressed by studies of the ice giants Uranus and Neptune. These questions relate to fundamental atmospheric processes that help us understand the formation, evolution, and current structure of all planets.Giant Planets – Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites.MarkDHofstadter.doc
David J. LoftusNASA Ames Research CenterThe Chemical Reactivity of Lunar Dust Relevant to Human ExplorationAs NASA prepares to return to the Moon, a clear understanding of the chemistry of lunar dust is required to set the stage for extended duration lunar surface operations. All aspects of the unique environment of the Moon—micrometeorite bombardment, UV light exposure, solar wind radiation, solar partiInner Planets – Mercury, Venus, and the Moon.DavidJLoftus.doc
Ian Garrick-BethellBrown UniversityEnsuring United States Competitiveness in the 21st Century Global Economy with a Long-Term Lunar Exploration ProgramA focused Lunar Exploration Program can help retain United States economic and strategic leadership in the 21st century.Inner Planets – Mercury, Venus, and the Moon.gathering_storm_white_paper_rev5.pdf
Tore StraumeNASA Ames Research CenterSolar Radiation Output: Reading the Record of Lunar RocksReconstructing solar energetic particle output by measuring signatures in lunar surface samplesInner Planets – Mercury, Venus, and the Moon.Straume.pdf
Jeffrey L. BadaScripps Institution of OceanographySeeking Signs of Life on Mars: In Situ Investigations as Prerequisites to Sample Return MissionsWe argue for deployment of increasingly sophisticated in situ techniques to definitively identify biomarkers before engaging in Mars Sample Return. We focus on “following the nitrogen,” using techniques such as micro capillary electrophoresis to identify and determine the chirality of primary aminesMars – Not Phobos and Deimos.JeffreyLBada.pdf
Eliot F. YoungSouthwest Research InstituteBalloon-Borne Telescopes for Planetary Science: Imaging and PhotometryThis white paper advocates the use of balloon-borne telescopes for diffraction-limited imaging in visible wavelengths by demonstrating their technical readiness and low cost relative to space- and ground-based facilities.Inner Planets – Mercury, Venus, and the Moon.

Mars – Not Phobos and Deimos.

Giant Planets – Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites.

Satellites – Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets.

Primitive Bodies – Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust.
EliotFYoung.pdf
J.B. DaltonJet Propulsion LaboratoryRecommended Laboratory Studies in Support of Planetary SciencePlanetary science in the next decade will include major spacecraft missions to inner and outer solar system targets. Interpretation of these mission observations requires knowledge of fundamental physical and chemical properties of planetary materials. Much theoretical work at present depends upon rInner Planets – Mercury, Venus, and the Moon.

Mars – Not Phobos and Deimos.

Giant Planets – Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites.

Satellites – Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets.

Primitive Bodies – Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust.
Lab_Studies_Decadal_Survey_Dalton.pdf
Mark SkidmoreMontana State UniversityPlanetary Science & Astrobiology: Cold habitats for life in the Solar systemThe paper highlights that improved knowledge of the carbon and energy transformations necessary to support life at sub-zero temperatures is key to future planetary science and astrobiological research given ice is the most abundant phase of water in the Solar system.Mars – Not Phobos and Deimos.

Satellites – Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets.
marklskidmore.doc
Paul A AbellNASA Johnson Space Center / Planetary Science InstituteScientific Investigation of Near-Earth Objects via the Orion Crew Exploration VehicleNASA has examined the feasibility of sending the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle to near-Earth objects during the next decade and beyond as part of its future Human Space Flight program. This paper describes the in-depth scientific investigations that could be accomplished by such missions.Primitive Bodies – Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust.PaulAAbell.doc
Julian NottNott Technology LLCTitan’s unique attraction: it is an ideal destination for humansWith so many opportunities in the Solar System it may be hard to choose destinations. Titan has a one quality that sets it apart: it is uniquely suitable for humans. One reason for robotic Mars exploration is that humans will arrive in due course. An identical justification applies to exploring TSatellites – Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets.JulianNott2.pdf
Eldar Z. Noe DobreaPlanetary Science IntituteNear-Infrared imaging spectroscopy of the surface of Mars at meter-scales to constrain the geological origin of hydrous alteration products, identify candidate sites and samples for future in-situ and sample return missions, and guide rover operationsNear-infrared imaging spectrometers capable of mapping hydrous minerals on the surface of Mars at meter-scales from orbit, as well as hypespectral NIR imagers on landed rovers not only enhance the scientific return of orbital and rover missions, but will be critical in guiding future rover operationMars – Not Phobos and Deimos.EldarZNoeDobrea.doc
David E. SmithNASA Goddard Space Flight CenerA budget phasing approach to Europa Jupiter System Mission ScienceDue to budget constraints, the proposed Europa Jupiter System Mission is unlikely to occur as planned. We propose to split EJSM into three small, more affordable and less risky missions that return science earlier (about the same time as the launch date of ELSM) and in easier to accomodate budgets.Satellites – Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets.Europa Jupiter White Paper v3.doc
Julian NottNott Technology LLCAdvanced Titan Balloon Design ConceptsNumerous studies agree that Titan is of outstanding scientific interest and Montgolfiere balloons ideal for its exploration. This paper examines balloon operations, weather and steering. It suggests novel concepts that may encourage radical thinking about Titan balloon designs.Satellites – Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets.JulianNott.pdf
Andrew SteeleCarnegie Institution of WashingtonAstrobiology Sample Acquisition and ReturnThis paper outlines an Astrobiology Sample Acquisition and Return mission based on the MEPAG Mid Range Rover concept mission for Mars exploration.Mars – Not Phobos and Deimos.Mid Range rover concept mission final.pdf
William B McKinnonWashington UniversityExploration Strategy for the Outer Planets 2013-2022: Goals and PrioritiesOuter Planets Assessment Group (OPAG) recommends that the DS support 1) the JEO and ESJM flagship, 2) Cassini Solstice Mission, and 3) Technology to permit next Outer Planets flagship to Titan/Enceladus, and assess the feasibility of 4) "small flagship" mission class and 5) a set of NF candidates.Giant Planets – Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites.

Satellites – Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets.
WilliamBMcKinnon.pdf
Erin Lee RyanUniversity of MinnesotaThe TRACER mission: a proposed Trojan and Centaur flyby missionThis paper presents a proposed flyby mission for one Trojan and one Centaur as designed by the participants of the JPL Planetary Science Summer School. This mission meets the current New Horizons guidelines and will address fundamental questions about the history of the solar system.Primitive Bodies – Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust.ErinLRyan.pdf
Michael R. CollierNASA/GSFCGlobal Imaging of Solar Wind-Planetary Body Interactions using Soft X-ray CamerasWe show in this white paper that, with suitable instrumentation on planetary and terrestrial spacecraft, soft X-ray emission associated with the solar wind interaction with planetary neutral atoms can map out the solar wind distribution around planets, including the locations of plasma boundaries.Inner Planets – Mercury, Venus, and the Moon.MichaelRCollier.doc
Sami W. AsmarJet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of TechnologyPlanetary Radio Science: Investigations of Interiors, Surfaces, Atmospheres, Rings, and EnvironmentsScientists utilize radio links between spacecraft and Earth or between spacecraft to examine changes in the phase/frequency, and amplitude of radio signals to investigate atmospheres and ionospheres, rings, surfaces, shapes, gravitational fields, and dynamics of solar system bodies.Inner Planets – Mercury, Venus, and the Moon.

Mars – Not Phobos and Deimos.

Giant Planets – Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites.

Satellites – Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets.

Primitive Bodies – Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust.
Radio Science Decadal White Paper 090915.pdf
Julie Castillo-RogezJet Propulsion Laboratory/CaltechLaboratory Studies in Support of Planetary GeophysicsWe summarize the rationale for advocating a healthy and sustained program of laboratory research in support of the geophysical exploration of planetary bodies. We address the challenges inherent to this discipline, and we suggest recommendations for the review panel's consideration.Inner Planets – Mercury, Venus, and the Moon.

Mars – Not Phobos and Deimos.

Giant Planets – Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites.

Satellites – Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets.

Primitive Bodies – Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust.
JulieCCastillo.pdf
Brad Jolliff and Noah PetroWashington University (BJ), Goddard Space Flight Center (NP)Constraining Solar System impact history and evolution of the terrestrial planets with exploration of and samples from the Moon’s South Pole-Aitken BasinA fundamental issue of Solar System science is determining the early history of the terrestrial planets, including giant impact bombardment and the evolution of differentiated crust. Exploration and sampling of the Moon’s South Pole–Aitken Basin can illuminate these formative planetary processes.Inner Planets – Mercury, Venus, and the Moon.BradleyLJolliff.pdf
Michael J. KavayaNASA Langley Research CenterMars Orbiting Pulsed Doppler Wind Lidar for Characterization of Wind and DustTechnology is described which is well developed and on a path for space. This technology could be used in Mars orbit to provide a global climatology of wind and relative dust as a function of location and altitude.Mars – Not Phobos and Deimos.MichaelJKavaya.pdf
Dave SmithNASA Goddard Space Flight CenerA budget phasing approach to Europa Jupiter System Mission ScienceFaced with budget constraints for the indefinite future, we propose to break the Europa Jupiter System Flagship Mission into three smaller, more affordable and lower risk missions that will get the first mission to Europa earlier and achieve much of the Flagship science before EJSM launch.Satellites – Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets.Europa Jupiter White Paper v2.doc
Naoya ImaeNational Institute of Polar ResearchSupporting the sample return from MarsI heartfully indicate the support on the sample return mission from Mars, and the indispensable facilities in laboratories. Because the sample return mission is the keys of essential problems for Planetary Science.Mars – Not Phobos and Deimos.WhitePaper.doc
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