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Date:  March 30, 2011

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

U.S. Earthquake Resilience Needs Strengthening, Says New Report

 

WASHINGTON — A new National Research Council report presents a 20-year road map for increasing U.S. resilience to earthquakes, including a major earthquake that could strike a highly populated area.  The report was mostly written prior to the March 11 earthquake in Japan, but the committee of experts who authored it noted that the Japanese experience is a reminder of the devastation that can occur even in a country acknowledged as a leader in implementing earthquake-resilience measures.

 

In recent decades, destructive earthquakes in the U.S. have only been moderate to strong in size or have occurred in sparsely populated areas; the country has not suffered a truly devastating earthquake in more than a hundred years.  Because of this, the committee expressed concern that many people have been lulled into a false sense of security that the nation already is earthquake resilient.  The committee highlighted the results of a recent earthquake-scenario exercise in Los Angeles, which indicated that a magnitude-7.8 earthquake would result in staggering losses, and noted the lack of disaster resilience demonstrated by Hurricane Katrina.

 

The report identifies an 18-task road map for implementing the strategic plan adopted by the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP), which would make the nation earthquake resilient.  Established by Congress in 1977, the multiagency program is led by the National Institute of Standards and Technology and includes the Federal Emergency Management Agency, National Science Foundation, and U.S. Geological Survey. 

 

The report endorses NEHRP's 2008 strategic plan and stresses that the road map tasks are required to develop the nation's capacity to maintain important community functions and recover quickly following damaging earthquakes.  The committee also emphasized that a dedicated and strategic effort is needed to diffuse knowledge gained by the NEHRP into communities. 

 

Funding for NEHRP totaled $129.7 million in 2009.  The committee estimated that the cost for its earthquake-resilience road map would be $306 million annually over the first five years. 

 

The 18 tasks are:

1.
Undertake additional research to improve understanding of earthquake phenomena and to increase earthquake-prediction capabilities.

2. Deploy the remaining 75 percent of the Advanced National Seismic System, which provides magnitude and location alerts within a few minutes after an earthquake as well as the basic data for many of the road map tasks.

3. Evaluate, test, and deploy earthquake early-warning systems.

4.
Complete coverage of national and urban seismic hazard maps to identify at-risk areas.

5. Develop and implement earthquake forecasting to provide communities with information on how seismic hazards change with time.

6.
Develop scenarios that integrate earth science, engineering, and social science information so that communities can visualize earthquake and tsunami impacts and mitigate potential effects.

7.
Integrate science, engineering, and social science information in an advanced GIS-based platform to improve earthquake risk assessment and loss estimation.

8.
Model expected and improvised emergency response and recovery activities and outcomes to improve pre-disaster mitigation and preparedness.

9.
Capture, disseminate, and create a repository of the critical information that describes the geological, structural, institutional, and socio-economic impacts and disaster response after earthquakes occur.

10.
 Support social sciences research to evaluate mitigation and recovery.

11.
Establish an observatory network to measure, monitor, and model the disaster vulnerability and resilience of communities.

12.
  Integrate the knowledge gained from many of the tasks to enable accurate simulations of fault rupture, seismic wave propagation through bedrock, and soil-structure interaction to understand the response of buildings and other structures to shaking and compute reliable estimates of financial loss, business interruption, and casualties.

13.
 Develop new techniques for evaluating and retrofitting existing buildings to better withstand earthquakes.

14.
Enhance performance-based engineering to achieve better building design and enable improved codes and standards for buildings and other structures.

15.
 Review and update standards so that critical "lifeline" infrastructure -- such as electricity, highways, and water supply -- can function following an earthquake.

16.
Develop and deploy the next generation of "green" high-performance construction materials and components for use in buildings' seismic framing systems.

17.
Encourage and coordinate technology transfer between the NEHRP and the private sector.

18.
 Initiate earthquake resiliency pilot projects in local communities to improve awareness, reduce risk, and enhance emergency preparedness and recovery capacity.

                       

The report was sponsored by the National Institute of Standards and Technology.  The National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council make up the National Academies.  They are independent, nonprofit institutions that provide science, technology, and health policy advice under an 1863 congressional charter.  Committee members, who serve pro bono as volunteers, are chosen by the Academies for each study based on their expertise and experience and must satisfy the Academies' conflict-of-interest standards.  The resulting consensus reports undergo external peer review before completion.  For more information, visit http://national-academies.org/studycommitteprocess.pdf.  A committee roster follows.

 

 

Contacts: 

Jennifer Walsh, Media Relations Officer

Shaquanna Shields, Media Relations Assistant

Office of News and Public Information

202-334-2138; e-mail news@nas.edu

 

Pre-publication copies of National Earthquake Resilience: Research, Implementation, and Outreach are available from the National Academies Press; tel. 202-334-3313 or 1-800-624-6242 or on the Internet at http://www.nap.edu.  Reporters may obtain a copy from the Office of News and Public Information (contacts listed above).

#       #       #

 

 

NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL

Division on Earth and Life Studies

Board on Earth Sciences and Resources            

 

Committee on National Earthquake Resilience – Research, Implementation, and Outreach

 

Robert M. Hamilton (chair)

Independent Consultant

Zelienople, Pa.

 

Richard A. Andrews

Independent Consultant

Relands, Calif.

 

Robert A. Bauer

Head

Engineering and Coastal Geology

Illinois State Geological Survey

Institute of Natural Resource Sustainability

University of Illinois

Champaign

 

Jane A. Bullock

Principal

Bullock and Haddow LLC

Reston, Va.

 

Stephanie E. Chang

Professor

School of Community and Regional Planning and Institute for Resources, Environment, and Sustainability

University of British Columbia

Vancouver

 

William T. Holmes

Vice President

Rutherford & Chekene, Consulting Engineers

San Francisco

 

Laurie A. Johnson

Principal

Laurie Johnson Consulting and Research

San Francisco

 

Thomas H. Jordan*

Director

Southern California Earthquake Center, and

W.M. Keck Professor of Earth Sciences

Department of Earth Sciences

University of Southern California

Los Angeles

 

Gary A. Kreps

Professor Emeritus

Sociology Department

College of William and Mary

Williamsburg, Va.

 

Adam Z. Rose

Research Professor

School of Policy, Planning, and Development

University of Southern California

Los Angeles

 

L. Thomas Tobin

Consultant

Tobin & Associates

Mill Valley, Calif.

 

Andrew S. Whittaker

Professor

Department of Civil, Structural, and

Environmental Engineering

State University of New York

Buffalo

 

STAFF

 

David Feary

Study Director

____________________________________

*  Member, National Academy of Sciences