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Date:  Jan. 3, 2008
Contact: Maureen O'Leary, Director of Public Information
Office of News and Public Information
202-334-2138; e-mail
news@nas.edu

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Scientific Evidence Supporting Evolution Continues To Grow; Nonscientific Approaches Do Not Belong In Science Classrooms


WASHINGTON -- The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and Institute of Medicine (IOM) today released SCIENCE, EVOLUTION, AND CREATIONISM, a book designed to give the public a comprehensive and up-to-date picture of the current scientific understanding of evolution and its importance in the science classroom.  Recent advances in science and medicine, along with an abundance of observations and experiments over the past 150 years, have reinforced evolution's role as the central organizing principle of modern biology, said the committee that wrote the book.

"SCIENCE, EVOLUTION, AND CREATIONISM provides the public with coherent explanations and concrete examples of the science of evolution," said NAS President Ralph Cicerone.  "The study of evolution remains one of the most active, robust, and useful fields in science."

"Understanding evolution is essential to identifying and treating disease," said Harvey Fineberg, president of IOM.  "For example, the SARS virus evolved from an ancestor virus that was discovered by DNA sequencing.  Learning about SARS' genetic similarities and mutations has helped scientists understand how the virus evolved.  This kind of knowledge can help us anticipate and contain infections that emerge in the future."

DNA sequencing and molecular biology have provided a wealth of information about evolutionary relationships among species.  As existing infectious agents evolve into new and more dangerous forms, scientists track the changes so they can detect, treat, and vaccinate to prevent the spread of disease.

Biological evolution refers to changes in the traits of populations of organisms, usually over multiple generations.  One recent example highlighted in the book is the 2004 fossil discovery in Canada of fish with "intermediate" features -- four finlike legs -- that allowed the creature to pull itself through shallow water onto land.  Scientists around the world cite this evidence as an important discovery in identifying the transition from ocean-dwelling creatures to land animals.  By understanding and employing the principles of evolution, the discoverers of this fossil focused their search on layers of the Earth that are approximately 375 million years old and in a region that would have been much warmer during that period.  Evolution not only best explains the biodiversity on Earth, it also helps scientists predict what they are likely to discover in the future.

Over very long periods of time, the same processes that enable evolution to occur within species also can result in the appearance of new species.  The formation of a new species generally takes place when one subgroup within a species mates for an extended period largely within that subgroup, often following geographical separation from other members of the species.   If such reproductive isolation continues, members of the subgroup may no longer respond to courtship from members of the original population.  Eventually, genetic changes become so substantial that members of different subgroups can no longer produce viable offspring.  In this way, new species can continually "bud off" of existing species.  

Despite the overwhelming evidence supporting evolution, opponents have repeatedly tried to introduce nonscientific views into public school science classes through the teaching of various forms of creationism or intelligent design.  In 2005, a federal judge in Dover, Pennsylvania, concluded that the teaching of intelligent design is unconstitutional because it is based on religious conviction, not science (Kitzmiller et al. v. Dover Area School District).  NAS and IOM strongly maintain that only scientifically based explanations and evidence for the diversity of life should be included in public school science courses.  "Teaching creationist ideas in science class confuses students about what constitutes science and what does not," the committee stated.

"As SCIENCE, EVOLUTION, AND CREATIONISM makes clear, the evidence for evolution can be fully compatible with religious faith.  Science and religion are different ways of understanding the world.  Needlessly placing them in opposition reduces the potential of each to contribute to a better future," the book says.

SCIENCE, EVOLUTION, AND CREATIONISM is the third edition of a publication first issued in 1984 and updated in 1999.  The current book was published jointly by the National Academy of Sciences and Institute of Medicine, and written by a committee chaired by Francisco Ayala, Donald Bren Professor of Biological Sciences, department of ecology and evolutionary biology, University of California, Irvine, and author of several books on science and religion.  A committee roster follows.  

The book was funded by the NAS, IOM, the Christian A. Johnson Endeavor Foundation, the Biotechnology Institute, and the Coalition of Scientific Societies.

Copies of SCIENCE, EVOLUTION, AND CREATIONISM will be available from the National Academies Press; tel. 202-334-3313 or 1-800-624-6242, or on the Internet at www.nap.edu/sec, for $12.95; a PDF version is FREE.  Reporters may obtain a copy from the Office of News and Public Information (contact listed above).  In addition, a podcast of the public briefing held to release this publication is available at http://national-academies.org/podcast. The NAS' evolution resources Web page, http://national-academies.org/evolution, allows easy access to books, position statements, and additional resources on evolution education and research.

The National Academy of Sciences is an independent society of scientists, elected by their peers for outstanding contributions to their field, with a mandate from Congress since 1863 to advise the federal government on issues of science and technology.  The Institute of Medicine was created in 1970 by the NAS to provide science-based advice on matters of biomedical science, medicine, and health.   

 

[This news release and book are available at http://national-academies.org ]

 

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE

 

Committee on Revising Science and Creationism: A View from the National Academy of Sciences

 

Francisco J. Ayala (chair) 1

Donald Bren Professor of Biological Sciences

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

University of California

Irvine

 

Bruce Alberts1

Professor

Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics

University of California

San Francisco

 

May R. Berenbaum1

Swanlund Professor of Entomology

Department of Entomology

University of Illinois

Urbana-Champaign

 

Betty A. Carvellas

Science Instructor

Essex Junction High School (retired)

Essex Junction, Vt.

 

M.T. Clegg1

Donald Bren Professor of Biological Sciences

Department of Ecology and Evolution

University of California

Irvine

 

G. Brent Dalrymple1

Professor and Dean Emeritus

Oregon State University

Corvallis

 

Robert M. Hazen

Staff Scientist

Carnegie Institution of Washington

Washington, D.C.

 

Toby Horn

Co-Director

Carnegie Academy for Science Education

Carnegie Institution of Washington

Washington, D.C.

 

Nancy A. Moran1

Regents’ Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

University of Arizona

Tucson

 

  Gilbert S. Omenn2

Professor of Medicine, Genetics, and Public Health

Center for Computational Medicine and Biology

University of Michigan Medical School

Ann Arbor

 

Robert T. Pennock

Professor

Department of Philosophy

Lyman Briggs School of Science

Michigan State University

East Lansing

 

Peter H. Raven1

Director

Missouri Botanical Garden

St. Louis

 

Barbara A. Schaal1

Spencer T. Olin Professor of Biology

Department of Biology

Washington University

St. Louis

Neil de Grasse Tyson

Visiting Research Scientist

Princeton University Observatory

Princeton, N.J.

 

Holly Wichman

Professor

Department of Biological Sciences

University of Idaho

Moscow

 

  NATIONAL ACADEMY  STAFF

 

  Jay B. Labov

  Study Director

 

  _________________________________________

  1 Member, National Academy of Sciences

  2 Member, Institute of Medicine