Date: Feb. 15, 2002

Contacts: National Academy of Engineering
Belinda Smith, Staff Associate
(202) 334-2262; e-mail <bfsmith@nae.edu>
Carrie Harless, Director, Office of Administration
(202) 334-2196; e-mail <charless@nae.edu>

National Academy of Engineering Elects
74 Members and Seven Foreign Associates

WASHINGTON -- The National Academy of Engineering has elected 74 new members and seven new foreign associates to its membership, NAE President Wm. A. Wulf announced today. This brings the total U.S. membership to 1,857 active members and 250 members emeriti, and the number of foreign associates to 158.

Election to the National Academy of Engineering is one of the highest professional distinctions that can be accorded an engineer. Academy membership honors those who have made "important contributions to engineering theory and practice" and those who have demonstrated "unusual accomplishment in the pioneering of new and developing fields of technology." A list of the newly elected members and foreign associates follows, with their primary affiliations at the time of election and a brief statement of their principal engineering accomplishments.

NAE New Members

Rakesh Agrawal, chief engineer, process synthesis, Air Products and Chemicals Inc., Allentown, Pa. For contributions to the development and worldwide implementation of high-efficiency and high-purity cryogenic and non-cryogenic gas separation processes.

William F. Banholzer, vice president, Global Technology and GE Plastics, Pittsfield, Mass. For breakthroughs in stealth materials and contributions to the isotope effect in solid-state physics, and for business leadership.

Frank S. Bates, professor and head, department of chemical engineering and materials science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. For important contributions on the phase behavior of polymer blends, particularly block co-polymers.

James A. Brierley, chief microbiologist and chief research scientist, Newmont Mining Corp., Englewood, Colo. For recognizing the potential of high-temperature biomining, and for innovative industrial biomining practices.

C. Jeffrey Brinker, senior scientist, inorganic materials chemistry division, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, N.M. For outstanding contributions to the science of sol-gel processing, and for the invention of porous materials with controlled structure.

Andrew Brown Jr., director of engineering, Delphi Automotive Systems, Troy, Mich. For the effective planning and integration of large-scale, highly diverse research and engineering activities.

Joe C. Campbell, Cockrell Family Regents Chair in Engineering, University of Texas, Austin. For contributions to the development of high-speed, low-noise avalanche photodiodes.

Michael J. Carey, technical director, BEA Systems Inc., San Jose, Calif. For contributions to the design, implementation, and evaluation of database systems.

Subrata K. Chakrabarti, president, Offshore Structure Analysis Inc., Plainfield, Ill. For major contributions to the field of hydrodynamics and fluid structure interaction in the design of harbor, coastal, and offshore structures.

Morris Chang, chairman and chief executive officer, Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co., Taipei. For contributions to the integrated circuit industry, the creation of the pure-foundry business model, and the enabling of the fabless semiconductor industry.

Douglas M. Chapin, president and director, MPR Associates Inc., Alexandria, Va. For improvements in reliability and the prevention and mitigation of core damage accidents in nuclear reactors worldwide.

Andrew R. Chraplyvy, director, light-wave systems research, Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, Holmdel, N.J. For contributions to the development of high-capacity optical fiber communication systems.

Joseph M. Colucci, president, Automotive Fuels Consulting Inc., Clarkston, Mich. For leadership at the "fuel/vehicle system" interface leading to improved automotive fuel and vehicle quality and reduced emissions.

Ross B. Corotis, chair, department of civil engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder. For the application of probabilistic modeling in design, new methods of reliability assessment and optimization of structures, and innovations in engineering education.

Henry Cox, chief scientist and senior vice president, ORINCON Corp., Arlington, Va. For contributions to the performance of U.S. Navy sonars and the development of undersea acoustic superiority.

John H. Crawford, director of microprocessor architecture, Intel Corp., Santa Clara, Calif. For the architectural design of widely used microprocessors.

John C. Crittenden, Presidential Professor, department of civil and environmental engineering, Michigan Technological University, Houghton. For the development of theory and the application of processes for removing toxic organic compounds from air and drinking water.

Edward L. Cussler, Institute of Technology Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. For pioneering research on membrane transport in chemical and biochemical separation, and for inspiring teaching.

Ruth A. David, president and chief executive officer, ANSER, Arlington, Va. For pioneering the use of digital information technologies for testing, simulations, information processing, and telecommunications for high-capacity, high-reliability applications.

Robert E. Dickinson, professor, earth and atmospheric sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta. For pioneering contributions to a wide range of topics in atmospheric dynamics and earth system modeling.

Bonnie J. Dunbar, assistant director for university research and affairs, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston. For personal leadership and significant contributions to solutions to engineering design problems in human space flight and to on-orbit operations.

Farouk El-Baz, professor and director, Center for Remote Sensing, Boston University, Boston. For selecting the landing sites for the Apollo missions, and for pioneering methods of discovering subsurface freshwater from space observations.

Robert E. Fontana Jr., research staff member, IBM Almaden Research Center, San Jose, Calif. For contributions to microfabrication techniques for the manufacture of thin-film storage devices.

Howard Frank, dean, college of business and management, University of Maryland, College Park. For contributions to the design and analysis of computer communication networks.

Robert W. Galvin, chairman of the executive committee, Motorola Inc., Schaumburg, Ill. For leadership in the commercialization of innovative electronics technologies, and for advancing the principles of Total Quality Management.

Jacques S. Gansler, professor and Roger C. Lipitz Chair, Center for Public Policy and Private Enterprise, School of Public Affairs, University of Maryland, College Park. For public and private leadership in the U.S. Department of Defense and major contributions in teaching missile guidance and control systems.

Fred W. Glover, MediaOne Professor of Systems Science, Leeds School of Business, University of Colorado, Boulder. For contributions to optimization modeling and algorithmic development, and for solving problems in distribution, planning, and design.

Thomas E. Graedel, professor of industrial ecology, chemical engineering, and geophysics, School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, New Haven, Conn. For outstanding contributions to the engineering theory and practice of industrial ecology, particularly for improved methods of life-cycle analysis.

William H. Hansmire, principal, Jacobs Associates, San Francisco. For pioneering leadership in the integration of the design and construction of tunneling projects, including the first design-build demonstration project for the U.S. Department of Transportation.

Ronald K. Hanson, chair, department of mechanical engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif. For the development and application of innovative laser diagnostics and sensors in the fields of combustion, chemical kinetics, and power conversion.

Alan J. Heeger, professor, Institute for Polymers and Organic Solids, University of California, Santa Barbara. For co-founding the field of conducting polymers and for pioneering work in making these novel materials available for technological applications.

Martin E. Hellman, professor emeritus of electrical engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif. For contributions to the theory and practice of cryptography.

W.S. Winston Ho, professor, department of chemical and materials engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington. For the invention and commercialization of novel separation technologies and the development of new theoretical models for membrane separations.

Berthold K.P. Horn, professor, department of electrical engineering and computer science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge. For contributions to computer vision, including the recovery of three-dimensional geometry from image intensities.

Roland N. Horne, professor and chair, department of petroleum engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif. For innovations in the development of techniques for the testing and optimization of petroleum reservoirs.

Edward E. Horton, president, Deepwater Technologies, Houston. For innovative contributions to the development of systems and structures for oil drilling and production in very deep water.

Evelyn L. Hu, professor, electrical and computer engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara. For contributions to the processing of semiconductor structures and devices.

Klavs F. Jensen, Lammot du Pont Professor of Chemical Engineering and professor of materials science and engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge. For fundamental contributions to multi-scale chemical reaction engineering with important applications in microelectronic materials processing and microreactor technology.

James T. Kajiya, assistant director of research, Microsoft Corp., Redmond, Wash. For contributions to formal and practical methods of computer image generation.

Adib K. Kanafani, Edward G. and John R. Cahill Professor of Civil Engineering and chairman, department of civil and environmental engineering, University of California, Berkeley. For significant contributions to national and international air transportation, the development of U.S. research on intelligent transportation, and the education of transportation professionals.

James C. Keck, Ford Professor of Engineering Emeritus and senior lecturer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge. For developing innovative, widely used new concepts for modeling coupled chemical and physical phenomena in engine combustion and high-temperature flows.

Kenneth H. Keller, director, Center for Science, Technology, and Public Affairs, and professor of chemical engineering and materials science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. For leadership in applying quantitative engineering analysis to vascular transport and artificial organ design and in public policy.

Chung K. (Ed) Law, Robert H. Goddard Professor, department of aerospace and mechanical engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, N.J. For outstanding contributions to the understanding of the fundamentals of combustion processes and theory and the applications in propulsion systems.

David M. Lederman, president and chief executive officer, ABIOMED Inc., Danvers, Mass. For designing, developing, and commercializing heart failure assist and heart replacement devices, and for leadership in engineering science education.

Mark J. Levin, chief executive officer, Millennium Pharmaceuticals Inc., Cambridge, Mass. For contributions to animal cell bioprocess scale-up, and for entrepreneurial leadership in biotechnology, specifically genomics.

Bede Liu, professor, department of electrical engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, N.J. For contributions to the analysis and implementation of digital signal processing algorithms.

Alan G. MacDiarmid, Blanchard Professor of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. For the co-discovery and development of conductive polymers.

Bernard S. Meyerson, IBM fellow and vice president, IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, N.Y. For the development of low-temperature epitaxy of SiGe for the fabrication of hetero-junction, bipolar, integrated circuits for telecommunications.

A. Stephen Morse, professor of electrical engineering, Yale University, New Haven, Conn. For contributions to geometric control theory, adaptive control, and the stability of hybrid systems.

Brij M. Moudgil, professor of materials science and engineering, and director, Engineering Research Center for Particle Science and Technology, University of Florida, Gainesville. For advances in mineral processing through innovations in selective polymer and surfactant coatings, and for professional leadership.

Gérard A. Mourou, A.D. Moore Distinguished University Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. For the introduction of the Chirped Pulse Amplification technique enabling high-intensity lasers.

Cherry A. Murray, senior vice president, physical sciences research, Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, N.J. For seminal work on order-disorder transitions in colloidal systems, and for leadership in bringing new concepts from research to production.

Thomas M. Murray, Montague-Betts Professor of Structural Steel Design, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg. For leadership in developing criteria for floor serviceability and major contributions to structural-steel design engineering practice.

Gordon C. Osbourn, senior scientist and team leader, vision science, pattern recognition, and multi-sensor algorithms, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, N.M. For originating the field of strained-layer superlattices and related structures, which has led to revolutionary advances in electronics and optoelectronics.

Christos H. Papadimitriou, chairman, computer science division, department of electrical engineering and computer science, University of California, Berkeley. For contributions to complexity theory, database theory, and combinatorial optimization.

Neil E. Paton, retired vice president, technology, Howmet Corp., Whitehall, Mich. For contributions to the development of advanced aluminum and high-temperature alloys for aerospace applications.

P. Hunter Peckham, professor of biomedical engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland. For developing implantable neuroprostheses to restore movement and independent function to paralyzed individuals.

Stephen M. Pollock, professor and past chair, department of industrial and operations engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. For contributions to the education, science, and analysis of public and private sector operational systems.

Buddy D. Ratner, professor and director, Engineered Biomaterials Center, University of Washington, Seattle. For contributions to the understanding of the surface interactions of biological molecules and cells with medical implants.

Arye Rosen, distinguished member, technical staff, Sarnoff Corp., Princeton, N.J. For contributions to microwave and laser technologies and the medical applications of these technologies.

Murray B. Sachs, Massey Professor and director, Whitaker Biomedical Engineering Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore. For contributions to the understanding of the neural encoding and signal processing of complex sounds, and for leadership in bioengineering education.

Edmund O. Schweitzer III, president, Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories Inc., Pullman, Wash. For technical innovation in power system protection and technology transfer leading to the commercialization of products in the electric power industry.

William A. Sirignano, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, University of California, Irvine. For contributions to the science and technology of spray combustion systems for propulsion.

Richard M. Stallman, president and founder, Free Software Foundation Inc., Boston. For starting the GNU project, which produced influential, non-proprietary software tools, and for founding the free software movement.

Subra Suresh, professor and head, department of materials science and engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge. For development of mechanical behavior theory and experiment for advanced materials and applications, and for demonstrating fruitful new avenues for structural study.

Rodney J. Tabaczynski, director, Powertrain and Vehicle Research, Ford Research Laboratory, Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, Mich. For major contributions to the understanding of processes in internal combustion engines resulting in improved performance and pollution control.

David W. Thompson, chairman of the board, president, and chief executive officer, Orbital Sciences Corp., Dulles, Va. For technical leadership in the conception and realization of small, flexible launch systems and spacecraft.

Moshe Y. Vardi, professor, department of computer science, Rice University, Houston. For contributions to the formal verification of hardware and software correctness.

Kenneth L. Walker, vice president, specialty fiber devices business unit, and chief technical officer, Network Cable Systems, Lucent Technologies, Somerset, N.J. For innovation and leadership in the fundamental understanding and process development for optical fibers and fiber devices.

Warren M. Washington, senior scientist and head, climate change research section, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colo. For pioneering the development of coupled climate models, their use on parallel supercomputing architectures, and their interpretation.

Elaine J. Weyuker, technology leader, AT&T Labs - Research, Florham Park, N.J. For contributions to software testing, reliability, and measurement, and for the development of mathematical foundations for software testing.

Donald C. Winter, president and chief executive officer, TRW Systems, Reston, Va. For pioneering contributions to high-powered laser technology and defense applications.

M. Gordon Wolman, professor, department of geography and environmental engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore. For outstanding contributions in fluvial processes, water resources management and policy, and environmental education.

Stephen Wozniak, Unuson Corp., and co-founder, Apple Computer Inc., Los Gatos, Calif. For the invention and development of the first mass-produced personal computer.

NAE New Foreign Associates

Hiroyuki Abe, president, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan. For outstanding contributions in the extraction of geothermal energy and leadership in the development of nondestructive evaluation and electronic packaging techniques.

Brian D.O. Anderson, director of research, School of Information Sciences and Engineering, and professor of systems engineering, Australian National University, Canberra. For contributions to system and control theory, and for international leadership in promoting engineering science and technology.

J. David Embury, professor, department of materials engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. For outstanding contributions to fundamental structure/mechanical property relations of materials and their applications.

Vladimir E. Fortov, academician and vice president, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow. For pioneering research of hot, dense matter under extreme conditions and for reforming and energizing engineering in Russia's civilian sector.

Brian W. Kernighan, professor, department of computer science, Princeton University, Princeton, N.J. For contributions to software and to programming languages.

Maria-Regina Kula, professor and director, Institute of Enzyme Technology, Heinrich-Heine University, Düsseldorf, Jülich, Germany. For contributions to the understanding and practice of enzyme-based chemical processes and protein separations.

Norbert Peters, Center for Turbulence Research, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif. For contributions to the field of combustion modeling of turbulent flames and the development of chemical kinetic mechanisms for hydrocarbon oxidation.

The National Academy of Engineering is a private, nonprofit institution. It provides leadership and guidance to the nation on the application of engineering resources to vital issues. Established in 1964, NAE operates under the congressional charter granted to the National Academy of Sciences in 1863. Visit the NAE Web site at http://www.nae.edu.

[This news release is available at http://national-academies.org]