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Committee Membership Information




Project Title: Long-Run Macro-Economic Effects of the Aging U.S. Population

PIN: DEPS-BMSA-10-01        

Major Unit:
Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education
Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences
Institute of Medicine

Sub Unit: Center for Economic, Governance, and International Studies
Board on Health Care Services
DEPS Board on Mathematical Sciences & Their Applications

RSO:

Weidman, Scott

Subject/Focus Area:  Business; Economics


Committee Membership
Date Posted:   04/13/2011


Dr. Roger W. Ferguson, Jr. - (Co-Chair)
Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association/

ROGER W. FERGUSON, JR., co-chair, is the president and chief executive officer at TIAA-CREF. Prior to holding this position, he was chairman, head of financial services, and a member of the executive committee at Swiss Re America Holding Corporation. Before joining Swiss Re, Dr. Ferguson served as vice chairman of the Board of Governors of the U.S. Federal Reserve System. He joined the Federal Reserve in 1997, and became vice chairman in 1999. He was a voting member of the Federal Open Market Committee, served as chairman of the Financial Stability Forum, and chaired Federal Reserve Board committees on banking supervision and regulation, payment system policy and reserve bank oversight. In 2001, he led the Federal Reserve’s immediate response to the terrorist attack on September 11. Prior to joining the Federal Reserve Board, Dr. Ferguson was an associate and partner at McKinsey & Company from 1984 to 1997. From 1981 to 1984, he was an attorney at the New York City office of Davis Polk & Wardwell, where he worked on syndicated loans, public offerings, mergers and acquisitions, and new product development. Dr. Ferguson is a member of the Board of Overseers of Harvard University and of the Board of Trustees of the Institute for Advanced Study. He is also a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the Group of Thirty. He holds a B.A., a J.D. and a Ph.D. in economics, all from Harvard University.

Dr. Ronald Lee - (Co-Chair)
University of California, Berkeley

RONALD LEE, co-chair, is a professor of demography and the Jordan Family professor of economics at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the director of the Center on the Economics and Demography of Aging at the University of California, Berkeley, funded by the National Institute on Aging. He has taught courses in economic demography, population theory, population and economic development, demographic forecasting, population aging, indirect estimation, and research design, as well as a number of pro-seminars. His current research focuses on intergenerational transfers and population aging. He co-directs with Andrew Mason the National Transfer Accounts project, which currently includes 28 collaborating countries, and is estimating intergenerational flows of resources through the public and private sectors. He also continues to work on modeling and forecasting demographic time series, and social security. Dr. Lee’s notable honors include the presidency of the Population Association of America (PAA), the Mindel C. Sheps Award for research in mathematical demography, the PAA Irene B. Taeuber Award for outstanding contributions in the field of demography, and an honorary doctorate from Lund University, Sweden. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and a corresponding member of the British Academy. Dr. Lee has held NIA MERIT Awards continuously from 1994 and will through 2013. He has chaired the population and social science study section for NIH and the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Population, and has served on both the National Advisory Committee on Aging (NIA Council) and the NICHD Council. He holds an M.A. in demography from the University of California, Berkeley, and a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University.

Dr. Alan J. Auerbach
University of California, Berkeley

ALAN J. AUERBACH is Robert D. Burch professor of economics and law at the University of California, Berkeley. He is also director of the Burch Center for Tax Policy and Public Finance. He served as an assistant, then associate, professor of economics at Harvard University, and as a professor of law and economics at the University of Pennsylvania. He has served as a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and as the deputy chief of staff on the U.S. Joint Committee on Taxation. Dr. Auerbach was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1999. He has authored numerous articles, books and reviews and is the past or present associate editor of six journals, including the Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Review, National Tax Journal, and International Tax and Public Finance. He holds a B.A. in economics and mathematics from Yale University and a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University.

Dr. Axel Boersch-Supan
University of Mannheim

AXEL BOERSCH-SUPAN is a professor of macroeconomics and public policy and founding and executive director of the Mannheim Research Institute for the Economics of Aging at Mannheim University, Germany. He is also a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and adjunct researcher at the RAND Corporation. As of July 1, 2011, he will be a full-time member of the Max Planck Society and a co-director of a new Max Planck Institute in Munich with a research focus on social law, social policy, and the economics of aging. He is a member of the German National Academy of Sciences, the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences, and the MacArthur Foundation Aging Societies Network. He was chairman of the Council of Advisors to the German Economics Ministry, has co-chaired the German Pension Reform Commission, and was member of the German President’s Commission on Demographic Change. Dr. Boersch-Supan has served as a consultant to many governments, including the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, and the World Bank. His current research focuses on household retirement and savings behavior, age and productivity, and the macroeconomic implications of global aging. He also directs the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE), a longitudinal data collection effort to study the interaction of health, aging and retirement processes in 19 countries, financed by the European Commission. He holds a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Dr. John Bongaarts
The Population Council

JOHN BONGAARTS is a vice president of the Policy Research Division at The Population Council and a Distinguished Scholar there. He has worked at The Population Council since 1973. His research focuses on a variety of population issues, including the determinants of fertility, population-environment relationships, the demographic impact of the AIDS epidemic, population aging, and population policy options in the developing world. Dr. Bongaarts is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Royal Dutch Academy of Sciences, and the Johns Hopkins Society of Scholars. He has received such awards as the Robert J. Lapham Award and the Mindel Sheps Award from the Population Association of America, and the Research Career Development Award from the National Institutes of Health. He holds an M.S. from the Eindhoven Institute of Technology, Netherlands, and a Ph.D. in physiology and biomedical engineering from the University of Illinois.

Dr. Susan M. Collins
University of Michigan

SUSAN M. COLLINS is the Joan and Sanford Weill dean of public policy at the Ford School and a professor of public policy and economics at the University of Michigan. Before coming to Michigan, she was a professor of economics at Georgetown University and a senior fellow with the Brookings Institution, where she retains a nonresident affiliation. Her area of expertise is international economics, including issues in both macroeconomics and trade. Her current work explores understanding the recent financial crisis, as well as growth experiences in selected industrial and developing countries. She recently co-authored studies comparing experiences in China and India, and examined challenges to economic growth in Puerto Rico. She is a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and the secretary/treasurer of the Executive Committee of the Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs (APSIA), and in 2006–08 was an elected member of the American Economic Association (AEA) Executive Committee. Dr. Collins served as a senior staff economist on the President’s Council of Economic Advisers during 1989–90 and chaired the AEA Committee on the Status of Minority Groups during 1994–98. She holds a B.A. in economics from Harvard University and a Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Dr. Deborah J. Lucas
Congressional Budget Office

DEBORAH J. LUCAS is the assistant director of the Financial Analysis Division at the Congressional Budget Office. She is currently on leave from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where she is a professor of finance for the Sloan School of Management. Dr. Lucas’s recent research has focused on the problem of measuring and accounting for risk in the evaluation of federal financial obligations and defined benefit pension liabilities. She has published papers on a wide range of topics including the effect of idiosyncratic risk on asset prices and portfolio choice, dynamic models of corporate finance, monetary economics, and valuing federal financial guarantees. Dr. Lucas recently edited the NBER book entitled Measuring and Managing Federal Financial Risk. She is a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, and a member of the National Academy of Social Insurance. Past appointments include chief economist for the Congressional Budget Office; senior staff economist for the Council of Economic Advisers; member of the Social Security Technical Advisory Panel; and professor of finance at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management. She holds a B.A. in economics and applied mathematics, an M.A. in economics, and a Ph.D. in economics, all from the University of Chicago.

Dr. Charles M. Lucas
Osprey Point Consulting

CHARLES M. LUCAS heads his own firm, Osprey Point Consulting. He is retired as corporate vice president and director of Market Risk Management at American International Group (AIG). Prior to joining AIG in 1996, he was the senior vice president and director of risk assessment and Control at Republic National Bank of New York, where he headed the Risk Assessment and Control Department, reporting to the Risk Assessment Committee of the Board of Directors. Prior to joining Republic in late 1993, Dr. Lucas was senior vice president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York (FRBNY) in charge of the international capital markets staff. He joined the Federal Reserve in 1968 as an economist in the Domestic Research Division, moving through a variety of posts until being appointed in 1974 as an officer of the FRBNY with the title of manager and assigned to the statistics department. He was granted a leave of absence in August 1978 to work with the IMF on a technical assistance mission to the Central Bank of Ceylon (now Sri Lanka). Dr. Lucas has also consulted in monetary policy planning and implementation with Bank Indonesia, Bangladesh Bank, and the Bank of Morocco. He returned to the FRBNY in 1979, serving in a variety of positions culminating in senior vice president. Dr. Lucas is a member of the Advisory Group on the Financial Engineering Program at the Haas School of Business, University of California at Berkeley; is a member of the Corporation, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; and is a director of Algorithmics, Incorporated. He holds a B.A. and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Berkeley.

Dr. Olivia S. Mitchell
University of Pennsylvania

OLIVIA S. MITCHELL is the International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans professor of insurance and risk management and the executive director of the Pension Research Council at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. She also directs the Boettner Center on Pensions and Retirement Research, is a fellow of the Wharton Financial Institutions Center and the Leonard Davis Institute, and sits on the Board of the Penn Aging Research Center. Concurrently Dr. Mitchell is a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and a co-investigator for the Health and Retirement Study at the University of Michigan. She also serves on the Advisory Committee to the Central Provident Fund of Singapore. Dr. Mitchell’s main areas of research and teaching are international private and public insurance, risk management, public finance, and compensation and pensions. Her extensive publications (18 books and over 100 articles) analyze pensions and healthcare systems, wealth, health, work, wellbeing, and retirement. Her co-authored study on Social Security reform won the Paul Samuelson Award for “Outstanding Writing on Lifelong Financial Security” from TIAA-CREF and she also received the Premio Internazionale Dell’Istituto Nazionale Delle Assicurazioni (INA) from the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei, Rome, Italy ex aqueo. Dr. Mitchell previously taught at Cornell University, and she has been a visiting scholar at Harvard University, the Goethe University of Frankfurt, Singapore Management University, and the University of New South Wales. She served on President Bush’s Commission to Strengthen Social Security, and the US Department of Labor’s ERISA Advisory Council. She is a member of the Board of Alexander and Alexander Services, Inc.; the National Academy of Social Insurance Board; and the Executive Committee for the American Economic Association. She also co-chaired the Technical Panel on Trends in Retirement Income and Saving for the Social Security Advisory Council; and she was a board member for the Committee on the Status of Women in the Economics Profession as well as the GAO Advisory Board. Dr. Mitchell has spoken for groups including the World Economic Forum; the International Monetary Fund; the Investment Company Institute; the International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans; the White House Conference on Social Security; and the President’s Economic Forum; and she has provided testimony to committees of the US Congress, the UK Parliament, the Australian Parliament, and the Brazilian Senate. She holds a B.A. in economics from Harvard University and an M.A. and Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

Dr. William D. Nordhaus
Yale University

WILLIAM D. NORDHAUS is Sterling professor of economics at Yale University. He has been on the Yale faculty since 1967 and has been full professor of economics since 1973. He is on the research staff of the National Bureau of Economic Research and the Cowles Foundation for Research, and has been a member and senior advisor of the Brookings Panel on Economic Activity, Washington, DC, since 1972. Dr. Nordhaus is current or past editor of several scientific journals and has served on the executive committees of the American Economic Association and the Eastern Economic Association. He serves on the Congressional Budget Office Panel of Economic Experts and was the first chairman of the Advisory Committee for the Bureau of Economic Analysis. He has also studied wage and price behavior, health economics, augmented national accounting, the political business cycle, and productivity. Dr. Nordhaus is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His 1996 study of the economic history of lighting back to Babylonian times found that the measurement of long-term economic growth has been significantly underestimated. In 2004, he was awarded the prize of “Distinguished Fellow” by the American Economic Association. From 1977 to 1979, he was a member of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers. From 1986 to 1988, he served as the provost of Yale University. He is the author of many books, among them Invention, Growth and Welfare, Is Growth Obsolete?, The Efficient Use of Energy Resources, Reforming Federal Regulation, Managing the Global Commons, Warming the World, and (joint with Paul Samuelson) the classic textbook, Economics, whose nineteenth edition was published in 2009. He holds a B.A. and M.A. from Yale University and a Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Dr. James M. Poterba
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

JAMES M. POTERBA is the Mitsui professor of economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is also the president of the National Bureau of Economic Research and a fellow of both the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Econometric Society. He is the past president of the National Tax Association, a former vice president of the American Economic Association, and a former director of the American Finance Association. Dr. Poterba’s research focuses on how taxation affects the economic decisions of households and firms. His recent work has emphasized the effect of taxation on the financial behavior of households, particularly their saving and portfolio decisions. He has been especially interested in the analysis of tax-deferred retirement saving programs such as 401(k) plans and in the role of annuities in financing retirement consumption. Dr. Poterba served as a member of the President’s Advisory Panel on Federal Tax Reform in 2005. He is a trustee of the College Retirement Equity Fund (CREF) and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. He edited the Journal of Public Economics, the leading international journal for research on taxation and government spending, between 1997 and 2006. He is a member of the advisory board of the Journal of Wealth Management. Dr. Poterba is a co-author of The Role of Annuity Markets in Financing Retirement (2001), and an editor or co-editor of Global Warming: Economic Policy Responses (1991), International Comparisons of Household Saving (1994), Empirical Foundations of Household Taxation (1996), Fiscal Institutions and Fiscal Performance (1999), and Fiscal Reform in Colombia (2005). He has been an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation fellow, a Batterymarch fellow, a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in Behavioral Sciences, and a distinguished visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. He holds a B.S. in economics from Harvard and a Ph.D. in economics from Oxford University.

Dr. John W. Rowe
Columbia University

JOHN W. ROWE is a professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. From 2000 until late 2006, Dr. Rowe served as chairman and chief executive officer of Aetna, Inc., one of the nation’s leading health care and related benefits organizations. Before his tenure at Aetna, from 1998 to 2000, Dr. Rowe served as president and chief executive officer of Mount Sinai NYU Health, one of the nation’s largest academic health care organizations. From 1988 to 1998, prior to the Mount Sinai-NYU Health merger, Dr. Rowe was president of the Mount Sinai Hospital and the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City. Before joining Mount Sinai, Dr. Rowe was a professor of medicine and the founding director of the Division on Aging at the Harvard Medical School, as well as chief of gerontology at Boston’s Beth Israel Hospital. He has received many honors and awards for his research and health policy efforts regarding care of the elderly. He was director of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Successful Aging and currently leads the MacArthur Foundation’s Research Network on An Aging Society. Dr. Rowe was elected a member of the Institute of Medicine, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a trustee of the Rockefeller Foundation and Lincoln Center Theater. He holds a B.S. from Canisius College and an M.D. from the University of Rochester.

Dr. Louise M. Sheiner
Federal Reserve System

LOUISE M. SHEINER is a senior economist at The Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. Prior to joining the Board of Governors, she was the deputy assistant secretary for economic policy at the U.S. Department of the Treasury and the senior staff economist for the Council of Economic Advisers. Dr. Sheiner’s expertise covers a range of disciplines including health, education, fiscal policy, public economics and welfare. Her recent publications include: Should America Save for Its Old Age? Fiscal Policy, Population Aging, and National Saving; Generational Aspects of Medicare; and Demographics and Medical Care Spending: Standard and Non-Standard Effects. She holds a B.A. in biology and a Ph.D. in economics, both from Harvard University.

Dr. David A. Wise
Harvard University

DAVID A. WISE is the John F. Stambaugh professor of political economy at Harvard University. He came to the Kennedy School after graduate work in economics at the University of California, Berkeley. His past research includes analysis of youth employment, the economics of education and schooling decisions, and methodological econometric work. His work now focuses on issues related to population aging, and he directs a large project on the economics of aging and health care at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His recent books and papers include: Social Security and Retirement Around the World; Frontiers in the Economics of Aging; Facing the Age Wave; Inquiries in the Economics of Aging; Social Security and Retirement Around the World: Micro-Estimation; The Transition to Personal Accounts and Increasing Retirement Wealth: Macro and Micro Evidence; Aging and Housing Equity: Another Look; Implications of Rising Personal Retirement Saving; The Taxation of Pensions: A Shelter Can Become a Trap; Utility Evaluation of Risk in Retirement Saving Accounts; and Analyses in the Economics of Aging. He holds a B.A. in French from the University of Washington, and an M.A. in statistics and Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Berkeley.

Committee Membership Roster Comments
Note (04-13-2011): There has been a change in committee membership with the addition of Axel Boersch-Supan.