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Committee Membership Information




Project Title: Survey of Surveys: Lessons Learned from the Decadal Survey Process

PIN: DEPS-SSB-13-01        

Major Unit:
Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences

Sub Unit: DEPS Space Studies Board

RSO:

Smith, David

Subject/Focus Area:  Earth Sciences; Policy for Science and Technology; Space and Aeronautics


Committee Membership
Date Posted:   05/27/2014


Dr. Alan Dressler - (Chair)
Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science

ALAN DRESSLER (NAS) is an observational astronomer at the Observatories of the Carnegie Institution. His principal areas of research cover the formation and evolution of galaxies and the study of star populations of distant galaxies. Dr. Dressler has made significant contributions in the understanding of galaxy formation and evolution, including effects of the environment on galaxy morphology. He was a leader in the identification of the “great attractor,” which causes a large distortion of the Hubble expansion. From 1993-1995 Dr. Dressler chaired the Associated Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) committee “HST & Beyond: Exploration and the Search for Origins” that presented NASA with A Vision for Ultraviolet-Optical-Infrared Space Astronomy, which now form a substantial component of the NASA program in astrophysics. Dr. Dressler received his Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of California. Dr. Dressler has previously served on a number of NRC committees, including the Planning Committee on Lessons Learned in Decadal Planning in Space: A Workshop (co-chair), the Astro2010 Panel on Electromagnetic Observations from Space (chair), the Committee on the assessment of a Plan for U.S. Participation in Euclid (member), the Panel on Implementing Recommendations from New Worlds, New Horizons Decadal Survey, and as a member of the Space Studies Board.

Dr. Daniel N. Baker
University of Colorado Boulder

DANIEL N. BAKER (NAE) is director of the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He's the Mooq-Broad Reach Endowed Chair of Space Sciences and holds appointments as professor of astrophysical and planetary sciences and as a professor of physics. His primary research interest is the study of plasma physical and energetic particle phenomena in planetary magnetospheres and in the Earth's vicinity. He conducts research in space instrument design, space physics data analysis, and magnetospheric modeling. He currently is an investigator on several NASA space missions including the MESSENGER mission to Mercury, the Magnetospheric MultiScale mission, and the Radiation Belt Storm Probes mission. He is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), the International Academy of Astronautics, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Among his other awards are the 2007 University of Colorado’s Robert L. Stearns Award for outstanding research, service, and teaching; and the 2010 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics’ James A. Van Allen Space Environments Award for excellence and leadership in space research. Dr. Baker served as president of the Space Physics and Aeronomy section of the AGU (2002-2004) and he presently serves on advisory panels of the U.S. Air Force and the National Science Foundation. He earned his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Iowa. Dr. Baker is a National Associate of the National Research Council. Dr. Baker’s most recent NRC service includes the Committee on the Review of the National Science Foundation’s Division on Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences (AGS) Draft Science Goals and Objectives (member), the Committee on the Effects of Solar Variability on Earth’s Climate: A Workshop (member), the Committee on a Decadal Strategy for Solar and Space Physics (chair), the committee on the Assessment of Impediments to Interagency Cooperation on Space and Earth Science Missions (co-chair) and the Space Studies Board (member).

Dr. David A. Bearden
The Aerospace Corporation

DAVID A. BEARDEN is General Manager of the NASA Programs Division within Civil and CommercialOperations at Aerospace, and is responsible for management technical leadership of the company's support to NASA Headquarters and Centers. Dr. Bearden leads a multi-disciplinary team of scientists and Dr. Bearden has corþorate responslbility for proposal preparation, proiect planning, and project delivery to NASA programs. Through training coursês and daily involvement in the delivery of technical expertise to customers, Dr. Bearden has gained considerable expertise concerning the issues, risks, and potentialsolutions in many cutting edge technical fields incluðing technology insertion analysis balancing benefit, cost and risk, as well as telecommunication and remote sensing. Dr. Bearden is a nationally recognized cost analysis expert, and has over 2O years of technical and managemenl expeiience in the acquisition and development of advanced technology space systems. Since joining The Aerospace Corporation in 1991, Dr. Bearden led the flu¡Ule Spabe Telescope Servicing Analysis of Alternatives which earned him the 2006 Aerospace Corporation's President's Award. ln the summer of 2009, he led the Aerospace team that served as the technical arm of the Augustine Committee. Dr. Bearden has ted various mission studies, including the Lunar Robotic Exploration Architecture and Mars Sample Return studies. He has served on a number of Standing Review Boards and National Academy Panels incfuding the Beyond Einstein Program Assessment Committee (BEPAC). Most recently, he served as a member of the SMAP, Aquarius, NuSTAR, and LCROSS Standing Revíew Boards. Dr. Bearden has authored ohapters in Spaoe Míssion Analysis and Desígn and Reducing the Cost of Space Sysfems. He was the recipient of the Aviation Week & Space Technology Annual Aerospace Laurels in 2000 for conducting "the first quantitative assessment of NASA's faster-better-cheaper initiative in space exploration." Dr. Bearden was awarded a Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, GA in 1999. He also earned an M.S. in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Southern California in 1993, and a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering and Computer Science from the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT in 1991. The Aerospace Gorporation, based in El Segundo, California, is an independent, nonprofit company that provides objective technical analyses and assessments for national security space programs and selected civil and commercial space programs in the national interest. Dr. Bearden’s previous NRC service includes the Committee on the Assessment of Impediments to Interagency Cooperation on Space and Earth Science Missions (member) and the Beyond Einstein Program Assessment Committee (member).



Dr. Roger D. Blandford
Stanford University

ROGER D. BLANDFORD (NAS) is the Luke Blossom Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences and, a Professor of Physics at Stanford University and at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, and on faculty at the Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Cosmology (KIPAC) at Stanford University. He is a distinguished theorist with broad expertise in high-energy and plasma astrophysics, active galactic nuclei, x-ray astronomy, and black holes. His research interests include cosmology, black hole astrophysics, gravitational lensing, galaxies, cosmic rays, neutron stars, and white dwarfs. Most recently Dr. Blandford was the chair of the Astro2010 Decadal Survey. Prior to this he was chair of the NSF Division of Astronomical Sciences Senior Review, which recommended significant changes in some NSF programs. Dr. Blandford is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, a member of the American Astronomical Society, a fellow of the Royal Society, a fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society, and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is a recipient of the AAS Helen B. Warner Prize, the AAS Dannie Heineman Prize, the Royal Astronomical Society Eddington Medal, and the Humboldt Research Award. From 2003-2013 he was the Pehong and Adele Chen Director of KIPAC. Dr. Blandford received his Ph.D. in 1974 from Magdalene College, Cambridge, UK, in Astrophysics. Dr. Blandford’s most recent service to the NRC includes the Committee on the Science of Team Science (current member), the Committee on an Assessment of the Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (AFTA) Mission Concepts (member), and the Committee on the Decadal Survey on Astronomy and Astrophysics 2010 (chair).

Dr. Stacey Boland
Jet Propulsion Laboratory

STACEY W. BOLAND is a senior systems engineer at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and is the Project Systems Engineer for ISS-RapidScat. Previously she served as the Observatory System Engineer for the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) Earth System Science Pathfinder mission. She is also a cross-disciplinary generalist specializing in Earth mission concept development and systems engineering and mission architecture development for advanced (future) Earth observing mission concepts. Dr. Boland received her B.S. in physics from the University of Texas, Dallas, and her M.S. and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from California Institute of Technology. Dr. Boland was awarded
NASA’s Exceptional Achievement Medal in 2009. Dr. Boland’s NRC service includes current membership on the Committee on Earth Science and applications from Space, and prior membership on the Planning Committee on Lessons Learned in Decadal Planning in Space: A Workshop, the Committee on the Assessment of NASA’s Earth Science Programs, and the Committee on the Assessment of Impediments to Interagency Cooperation on Space and Earth Science Missions

Dr. Wendy M. Calvin
University of Nevada, Reno

WENDY M. CALVIN is a professor at the Department of Geological Sciences of the University of Nevada, Reno. Her research focuses on understanding the nature and association of water, volatile ices and minerals in order to better understand physical and chemical processes occurring in a variety of planetary and space environments. Her studies include meteorites, asteroids, icy satellites, Mars and Earth. Dr. Calvin helped discover oxygen in the surface of Jupiter’s moon Ganymede, ammonia ices on Pluto’s satellite Charon, and has an active research program to understand the polar regions of Mars. She was a participating scientist with the Mars Exploration Rovers, and she was co-investigator on the MARCI camera for the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Dr. Calvin received her Ph.D. in geophysics from the University of Colorado, Boulder. Her previous NRC service includes the committee on the Planetary Science Decadal Survey: 2013-2022 (member), the Planetary Science Decadal Survey: Mars Panel (vice-chair), and the Review of the NASA Strategic Roadmaps: Science Panel (member).

Dr. Athena Coustenis
National Centre for Scientific Research of France

ATHENA COUSTENIS is a director of research with France’s National Centre for Scientific Research of France and is currently based at Paris Observatory in Meudon. Her research focuses on the use of ground and space-based observations of solar system bodies. Her current interests include of planetary atmospheres and surfaces, with particular emphasis on the icy satellites of the giant planets. She is also interested in the characterization of the atmospheres of extrasolar planets. In the recent years she has been leading efforts to define and select of future space missions to be undertaken by the European Space Agency (ESA) and its international partners. She is the incoming chair of the European Science Foundation’s European Space Science Committee—the nearest equivalent to the SSB in Europe. She earned her Ph.D. in astrophysics and space techniques from the University of Paris. Dr. Coustenis works in the field of planetology. Dr. Coustenis has also chaired and served on numerous ESA and NASA advisory groups, but she has no previous record of NRC service.

Dr. J. Todd Hoeksema
Stanford University

J. TODD HOEKSEMA is a senior research scientist in the W.W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory at Stanford University. His professional experience includes research administration, system and scientific programming, and the design, construction, and operation of instruments to measure solar magnetic and velocity fields from both ground and space. He is co-investigator and magnetic team lead for the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory and the instrument scientist for the Michelson Doppler Imager instrument on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory that was launched by NASA and the European Space Agency. He has been associated with the Wilcox Solar Observatory at Stanford for three sunspot cycles. His primary scientific interests include the physics of the Sun and the interplanetary medium, solar-terrestrial relations, the large-scale solar and coronal magnetic fields, solar velocity fields and rotation, helioseismology, and education and public outreach. Dr. Hoeksema was chair of the Solar Physics Division of the American Astronomical Society, and has served on the heliophysics subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council Science Committee. Dr. Hoeksema led NASA's Heliophysics Roadmap team in 2005. He has been awarded the NASA distinguished public service medal and is a member of the AAS, American Geophysical Union, International Astronomical Union, American Scientific Affiliation, and American Association for the Advancement of Science. In addition, for several years Dr. Hoeksema was the vice-chair of Commission E.2 of the Committee on Space Research. He earned his Ph.D. in applied physics from Stanford University. Dr. Hoeksema is the current co-chair of the Committee on Solar and Space Physics, and previously served on the Committee on the Assessment of the NASA Science Mission Directorate 2014 Science Plan (member), the Planning Committee on Lessons Learned in Decadal Planning in Space: A Workshop (member), the Committee on a Decadal Strategy for Solar and Space Physics (member), and the Astro2010 Panel on Optical and Infrared Astronomy from the Ground (member).

Dr. Anthony C. Janetos
Boston University

ANTHONY C. JANETOS joined Boston University in May 2013 as director of the Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer Range Future and professor of Earth and Environment. Previously, he served as director of the Joint global Change Research Institute at the University of Maryland, where for six years he oversaw an interdisciplinary team of natural scientists, engineers, and social scientists committed to understanding the problems of global climate change and their potential solutions. Earlier, he was a senior research fellow at the H. John Heinz III Center for Science, Economics, and the Environment. In 1999, he joined the World Resources Institute as senior vice president and chief of program. Previously, he served as senior scientist for the Land Cove and Land Use Change Program in NASA’s Office of Earth Science and was program scientist for the Landsat 7 mission. He had many years of experience in managing scientific research programs on a variety of ecologic and environmental topics, including air pollution effects on forests, climate change impacts, land-use change, ecosystem modeling, and the global carbon cycle. Dr. Janetos received his B.S. in biology from Harvard University and his M.S. and Ph.D. in biology from Princeton University. He was a co-chair of the U.S. National Assessment of the Potential Consequences of climate Variability and Change and an author of Land-Use, Land-Use Change, and Forestry (an IPCC special report) and global Biodiversity Assessment. His most recent prior NRC experience includes service on the Planning Committee on Lessons Learned in Decadal Planning in Space: A Workshop (member), the Committee on the Assessment of NASA’s Earth Science Programs (member) the Committee on Socioeconomic Scenarios for Climate Change Impact and Response Assessments (member) and the Climate Research Committee (member). Dr. Janetos is currently a member of the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate and the Space Studies Board.



Dr. Stephen Mackwell
Lunar and Planetary Institute

STEPHEN MACKWELL is the director of the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, Texas. He is adjunct professor of Earth Science at Rice University. Prior to his current appointment, Dr. Mackwell served as the director of the Bayerisches Geoinstitut at the University of Bayreuth, Germany. Dr. Mackwell has served as program director for geophysics, Division of Earth Sciences, National Science Foundation (NSF; 1993-1994); as member, group chief, and panel chair of the review panel for NASA’s Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program; as expert reviewer for the Department of Energy’s Geosciences Research Program (1993); and as expert consultant for the Division of Earth Sciences, National Science Foundation (1995). Dr. Mackwell conducts laboratory-based research into the physical, chemical, and mechanical properties of geological materials under conditions relevant to the mantle and crust of Earth and other terrestrial planets. He served on the NRC Committee on New Opportunities in Solar System Exploration, the NRC Committee to Review Near-Earth-Object Surveys and Hazard Mitigation Strategies, the NRC Committee on the Planetary Science Decadal Survey, the NRC Planning Committee on Lessons Learned in Decadal Planning in Space: A Workshop, and the NRC Committee on Review of the Draft 2014 Science Mission Directorate Science Plan. He currently serves on the NRC Committee on Astrobiology and Planetary Science.

Dr. Norman H. Sleep
Stanford University

NORMAN H. SLEEP (NAS) is a professor of geophysics at Stanford University. Dr. Sleep’s research interests include studying convection at the base of the lithosphere and the interaction of the lithosphere with mantle plume material. He is also currently investigating the microphysics of friction and applying the results to nonlinear attenuation and ground damage by strong seismic waves. Dr. Sleep is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences, the Geological Society of America, and the American Geophysical Union. He has received a number of awards for his work including the James B. Macelwane award, the George P. Woollard Award from the Geological Society of America, and the 2008 Wollaston Medal from the Geological Society of London. Dr. Sleep earned a B.S. in mathematics from Michigan State University and a M.S. and Ph.D. in geophysics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His current NRC service includes the Committee on Astrobiology and Planetary Science (member), the Panel on Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, and he is the current section liaison for the NAS Section 15.

Dr. Charles E. Woodward
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis

CHARLES WOODWARD is a professor of astronomy at the University of Minnesota. He is an infrared astronomer who conducts studies on astronomical dust particles produced in the atmosphere of evolved stars and cometary dust in the solar system. He is chair of the International Gemini Board, an elected councilor of the American Astronomical Society, and has chaired the American Astronomical Society Committee on the Status of Minorities in Astronomy. Dr. Woodward served as a presidential faculty fellow at the University of Wyoming where he was a professor and a National Science Foundation fellow. His published research has covered infrared spectroscopy, star formation, evolved stellar populations, novae, and comets. In 1997, he co-authored an article on the baffling halo emission from Galaxy NGC5907 for Nature. Dr. Woodward’s most recent service to the NRC included the Space Studies Board (member) and the Astro2010 Panel on Optical and Infrared Astronomy from the Ground (member).



Mr. A. Thomas Young
Lockheed Martin Corporation [Retired]

A. THOMAS YOUNG (NAE) is executive vice president, retired, at Lockheed Martin Corporation. He is currently chair of the board of SAIC. Mr. Young was previously the president and chief operating officer of Martin Marietta Corporation. Prior to joining industry, Mr. Young worked for 21 years at NASA where he directed the Goddard Space Flight Center, was deputy director of the Ames Research Center, and directed the Planetary Program in the Office of Space Science at NASA Headquarters. Mr. Young received high acclaim for his technical leadership in organizing and directing national space and defense programs, especially the Viking program. He is currently a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and of the American Astronautical Society. He earned his M.S. in management from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Mr. Young’s NRC service includes current membership on the Committee on Astronomy and Astrophysics and prior membership on the Committee on the Assessment of the Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (AFTA) Mission Concepts (member), the Planning Committee on Lessons Learned in Decadal Planning in space: A Workshop (member), the Committee on the Planetary Science Decadal Survey: 2013-2022 (member), the Panel on Implementing Recommendations from New Worlds, New Horizons Decadal Survey (member), the Committee on the Decadal Survey on Astronomy and Astrophysics 2010 (member) and the Space Studies Board (vice chair).