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Committee Membership Information




Project Title: An Assessment of the Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (AFTA) Mission Concepts

PIN: DEPS-SSB-13-06        

Major Unit:
Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences

Sub Unit: DEPS Board on Physics & Astronomy
DEPS Space Studies Board

RSO:

Lang, David

Subject/Focus Area:  Math, Chemistry and Physics; Space and Aeronautics


Committee Membership
Date Posted:   01/07/2014


Dr. Fiona A. Harrison - (Chair)
California Institute of Technology

FIONA A. HARRISON is the Benjamin M. Rosen Professor of Physics and Astronomy at the California Institute of Technology in the Space Radiation Laboratory. She is the principal investigator for Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) Small Explorer, launched in 2012. Dr. Harrison's primary research interests are in experimental and observational high-energy astrophysics. In addition, she has an active observational program in gamma-ray, x-ray, and optical observations of gamma-ray bursts, active galaxies, and neutron stars. Dr. Harrison was awarded the Robert A. Millikan Prize Fellowship in Experimental Physics in 1993 and the Presidential Early Career Award in 2000. She was named one of America's Best Leaders by U.S. News and the Kennedy School of Government in 2008 and received the NASA Outstanding Public Leadership Medal in 2008. She has also served on the AAS High Energy Astrophysics Division Executive Committee and several Spitzer Science Center and Michelson Science Center Oversight Committees. She is a member of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) and a fellow of the American Physical Society (APA). She was a NASA graduate student research fellow from 1989-92 and received her Ph.D. in physics from the University of California, Berkeley in 1993. She has served on several NRC committees including the NRC ‘s Decadal Survey on Astronomy and Astrophysics 2010, the Committee on NASA's Beyond Einstein Program: An Architecture for Implementation, the Committee on the Physics of the Universe (producing the “Quarks to the Cosmos” report), and she was a member of the Space Studies Board.

Dr. Marcia J. Rieke - (Vice Chair)
University of Arizona

MARCIA J. RIEKE (NAS) is a Regents’ Professor of Astronomy at the University of Arizona in the Department of Astronomy. Her research interests include infrared observations of galactic nuclei and high-redshift galaxies. She has served as the deputy principal investigator on the near-infrared camera and multi-object spectrometer (NICMOS) for the Hubble Space Telescope, and she is currently the principal investigator for the near-infrared camera (NIRCam) for the James Webb Space Telescope. Dr. Rieke has worked on the Spitzer Space Telescope as a co-investigator for the multiband imaging photometer and as an outreach coordinator and as a member of the Science Working Group. She was also involved with several infrared ground observatories, including the Multiple Mirror Telescope in Arizona. Dr. Rieke is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Rieke currently serves on the NRC’s Space Studies Board and the Committee on Astronomy and Astrophysics. She received her Sc.D. in physics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her previous NRC service includes as co-vice chair of the Astro2010 Decadal Survey Committee; as a member on the 2000 astronomy and astrophysics decadal survey steering committee; as a vice chair on the Panel on Ultraviolet, Optical, and Infrared Astronomy from Space for the 2000 survey; and as a member on the Steering Committee for the Task Group on Space Astronomy and Astrophysics, and the U.S. National Committee for the International Astronomical Union.

Dr. Roger D. Blandford
Stanford University

ROGER D. BLANDFORD (NAS) is the Luke Blossom Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences and, a Professor of Physics at Stanford University and at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, and on faculty at the Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Cosmology (KIPAC) at Stanford University. He is a distinguished theorist with broad expertise in high-energy and plasma astrophysics, active galactic nuclei, x-ray astronomy, and black holes. His research interests include cosmology, black hole astrophysics, gravitational lensing, galaxies, cosmic rays, neutron stars, and white dwarfs. Most recently Dr. Blandford was the chair of the Astro2010 Decadal Survey. Prior to this he was chair of the NSF Division of Astronomical Sciences Senior Review, which recommended significant changes in some NSF programs. Dr. Blandford is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, a member of the American Astronomical Society, a fellow of the Royal Society, a fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society, and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is a recipient of the AAS Helen B. Warner Prize, the AAS Dannie Heineman Prize, the Royal Astronomical Society Eddington Medal, and the Humboldt Research Award. From 2003-2013 he was the Pehong and Adele Chen Director of KIPAC. Dr. Blandford received his Ph.D. in 1974 from Magdalene College, Cambridge, UK, in Astrophysics. He chaired the NRC’s Committee to Review the Science Requirements for the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) and was a member of a number of other NRC committees including: Committee on an Assessment of Balance in NASA's Science Programs, Committee on Review of Progress in Astronomy and Astrophysics toward the Decadal Vision, Committee on the Scientific Context for Space Exploration, Panel to Review Terrestrial Planet Finder Science Goals, and Committee on Physics of the Universe. He was chair of a panel during the McKee/Taylor survey on Panel on High-Energy Astrophysics from Space. He is a former co-chair of the Committee on Astronomy and Astrophysics (CAA) standing committee and is a former member of the SSB.

Mr. Erik L. Burgess
Burgess Consulting, Inc.

ERIK L. BURGESS is president at Burgess Consulting, Inc. He has 22 years of experience in space systems engineering, cost/schedule/risk analysis, military logistics, and information technology management, with expertise in space system cost estimation. He is a frequent speaker at national symposia and technical conferences. Prior to starting Burgess Consulting, he was a technical manager at MCR Federal, Inc., a principal consultant at PWC Consulting, LLP., a senior project engineer at The Aerospace Corporation, and a research assistant at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Mr. Burgess has been published in a number of journals, including the Journal of Cost Analysis and Parametrics and the Journal of Parametrics.

Dr. John E. Carlstrom
The University of Chicago

JOHN E. CARLSTROM (NAS) is the Subramanyan Chandrasekhar Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago in the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics. He also serves as professor in the Department of Physics, and the Enrico Fermi Institute. As well, he is director of the Center for Astrophysical Research in Antarctica (CARA) and deputy director of the Physics Frontier Center and the Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics. Dr. Carlstrom is a partner in the international South Pole Telescope project. He is regarded as a leading experimentalist in the field of cosmology through precision measurements of the cosmic microwave background with extremely sensitive detectors. He has studied the cosmic microwave background with extremely sensitive detectors. His Degree Angular Scale Interferometer in Antarctica revealed the microwave background's long-sought polarization. He has also led efforts to study imprints in the microwave background created by massive clusters of galaxies, and has done pioneering research on young solar systems. He is involved with the Dark Energy Survey at The University of Chicago, the Interferometric Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Imaging Experiment (SZE), and the Sunyaev-Zeldovich Array (SZA). He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and he received the MacArthur Fellowship award in 1998. He has received NASA's Medal for Exceptional Scientific Achievement. He received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Carlstrom has served on numerous NRC committees including the NRC’s Decadal Survey on Astronomy and Astrophysics 2010, the U.S. National Committee for the International Union of Radio Science, the Committee to Review the Science Requirements for the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), and the Committee on Astronomy and Astrophysics (CAA). He is a former member of the Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee (AAAC) that advises NSF, NASA, and DOE on selected issues within the fields of astronomy and astrophysics. He was a member of the Panel on Radio and Submillimeter-wave Astronomy of the McKee/Taylor survey.

Dr. Megan Donahue
Michigan State University

MEGAN DONAHUE is a professor at Michigan State University in the Department of Physics and Astronomy. Her research interests include distribution and cooling flows of the intergalactic gas, star formation in bright galaxies, and distant galactic clusters, for which she uses data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and Hubble Space Telescope and the European Space Agency's X-ray Multi-Mirror Newton X-ray Observatory. She also uses the Spitzer and SOAR (the MSU Chilean telescope) programs to study cooling flows and clusters. She also served on the first WFIRST Science Definition Team and currently serves on the AFTA Science Definition Team. Dr. Donahue earned her B.S. in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her Ph.D. in astrophysics from the University of Colorado. She previously served on the NRC Astro2010 Decadal Survey Panel on Electromagnetic Observations from Space, the U.S. National Committee for the International Astronomical Union, and the NASA Astrophysics Performance Assessment Committee. She is currently a member of the CAA.

Dr. Timothy M. Heckman
Johns Hopkins University

TIMOTHY M. HECKMAN is the inaugural Dr. A. Hermann Pfund Professor at Johns Hopkins University in the Department of Physics and Astronomy. He is also the director of the Center for Astrophysical Sciences, where he is responsible for promoting and supporting research in astrophysics, nurturing large-scale projects and providing them with an organizational structure, providing a forum and a focus for strategic planning, fostering cooperation between the different elements of the local astrophysics and space science communities, and providing a structured career path for the non-tenure-track research staff. His research interests include galaxy evolution, starbursts, black holes, and active galactic nuclei. Dr. Heckman is a member of the GALEX Science Team, a builder of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), chair of the Pan-STARRS1 Science Consortium Board, vice chair of the Board of the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, and he was the chair of the Astrophysical Research Consortium (ARC) board of governors, during which time ARC established the SDSS. He is also involved with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory Visiting Committee, the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) North American Science Advisory Committee, and the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Advisory Committee. He has authored or co-authored more than 600 scholarly publications that have been cited more than 28,000 times, and he has been invited to give nearly 100 talks at national and international conferences. Dr. Heckman received his B.A. magna cum laude from Harvard College and his Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Washington. He was a member of the NRC’s Committee on Astronomy and Astrophysics and was a member of the NRC’s Decadal Survey on Astronomy and Astrophysics 2010. He is currently a CAA member.

Dr. James Patrick Lloyd
Cornell University

JAMES P. LLOYD is an associate professor of astronomy at Cornell University. He also serves as professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering He is currently developing new techniques in experimental astrophysics to directly detect extrasolar planets. Specifically, he works on coronagraphy, interferometry, and adaptive optics. Dr. Lloyd’s work includes the calibration of “Extreme Adaptive Optics” systems, which employ new techniques in interferometry combined with adaptive optics and concepts for an interferometer in Antarctica. He has reviewed proposals for the NSF’s Advanced Technologies and Instrumentation program, and is part of the working group for the Hubble Space Telescope’s Cycle 12 comparison of Ground Based Adaptive Optics. He is the principal investigator for two nanosatellites, CUSat and Violet, which are being built by Cornell undergraduates. He served on the JWST Aperture Masking science team. He is currently heavily engaged in a survey of the Kepler field with the GALEX satellite. He received his B.S. in physics from the University of New South Wales in Australia, and his M.A. and Ph.D. in astrophysics from the University of California at Berkeley in 2002. He was a member of the Astro2010 Planetary Systems and Star Formation Science Frontier Panel.

Dr. Miguel Morales
University of Washington

MIGUEL MORALES is an assistant professor at the University of Washington in the Department of Physics. He previously served in postdoc and research scientist positions at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics before joining the faculty at University of Washington in 2008. He has been heavily involved in the design and construction of the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) and has played a leading role in measuring the Epoch of Reionization power spectrum. He received his B.S. in physics from Swarthmore College. He taught high school physics, astronomy and chemistry for 3 years before returning to graduate school, where he received a Ph.D. in physics from the University of California, Santa Cruz. He served on the NRC Astro2010 Panel on Radio, Millimeter, and Submillimeter from the Ground.

Dr. Edward L. Wright
University of California, Los Angeles

EDWARD L. WRIGHT (NAS) is the David Saxon Presidential Chair in Physics and a professor of astronomy at the University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Wright’s research interests are in theoretical and experimental infrared astronomy and cosmology, especially cosmic microwave background radiation studies. He played a major role on the NASA Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) mission, and in 1992 he received the NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal for this work. He was a co-investigator on NASA’s Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, a mission that is a follow-up to the COBE discovery of fluctuations in the early universe. Dr. Wright participated in the Joint Efficient Dark-energy Investigation and he is an interdisciplinary scientist on the NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope Science Working Group. Dr. Wright was the principal investigator for the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer MidEx mission launched in 2009. Dr. Wright has a Ph.D. in astronomy from Harvard University. He has been a member of the NRC’s Committee on NASA's Beyond Einstein Program: An Architecture for Implementation; the Panel on Astronomy and Astrophysics; the Committee on Physics of the Universe; and the Panel on Ultraviolet, Optical, and Infrared Astronomy from Space. He is currently a member of the Autonomy Research for Civil Aviation Committee.

Mr. A. Thomas Young
Lockheed Martin Corporation [Retired]

A. THOMAS YOUNG (NAE) is executive vice president, retired, at Lockheed Martin Corporation. He is currently chair of the board of SAIC. Mr. Young was previously the president and chief operating officer of Martin Marietta Corporation. Prior to joining industry, Mr. Young worked for 21 years at NASA. At NASA, he directed the Goddard Space Flight Center, was deputy director of the Ames Research Center, and directed the Planetary Program in the Office of Space Science at NASA Headquarters. Mr. Young received high acclaim for his technical leadership in organizing and directing national space and defense programs, especially the Viking program. He is currently a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and of the American Astronautical Society. He earned his M.S. in management from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Mr. Young previously served as the vice chair of the NRC’s Space Studies Board and has extensive NRC experience. Prior committee service includes membership on the Planetary Science Decadal Survey steering committee, the Astro2010 Decadal Survey Committee and subsequent Panel on Implementing Recommendations from New Worlds, New Horizons Decadal Survey, and the Committee on Assessment of Impediments to Interagency Cooperation on Space and Earth Science Missions. He is currently a member of the CAA.