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Committee Membership Information




Project Title: Assessment of NASA's Earth Science Program

PIN: DEPS-SSB-10-10        

Major Unit:
Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences

Sub Unit: DEPS Space Studies Board

RSO:

Charo, Art

Subject/Focus Area:  Earth Sciences; Space and Aeronautics


Committee Membership
Date Posted:   04/26/2011


Dr. Dennis L. Hartmann - (Chair)
University of Washington

DENNIS L. HARTMANN is a professor in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Washington, where he served as chair was and as interim dean of the College of the Environment. He is also the chair of the board of trustees of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). His main research interests are in low-frequency variability in the atmosphere and climate system, stratospheric ozone, global climate change, large-scale dynamics, and the radiative energy balance of Earth. His primary areas of expertise are atmospheric dynamics, radiation and remote sensing, and mathematical and statistical techniques for data analysis. Dr. Hartmann is a fellow of the American Meteorological Society (AMS), the American Geophysical Union (AGU),the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and the Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean. He is the recipient of the NASA Distinguished Service Medal. He received his B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Portland and a Ph.D. in geophysical fluid dynamics from Princeton University. Dr. Hartmann previously served on the NRC Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, the Committee on Scientific Accomplishments of Earth Observations from Space, and the Committee for Review of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program’s Synthesis and Assessment Product on Temperature Trends in the Lower Atmosphere.

Dr. Mark R. Abbott
Oregon State University

MARK R. ABBOTT is dean of the College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University at Corvallis. His research focuses on the interaction of biological and physical processes in the upper ocean, remote sensing of ocean color and sea surface temperature, phytoplankton fluorescence, and length and time scales of phytoplankton variability. He deployed the first array of bio-optical moorings in the Southern Ocean as part of the United States Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS). Dr. Abbott chairs the U.S. JGOFS Science Steering Committee and was a member of the MODIS and SeaWiFS science teams. He is currently a member of the board of trustees for the Consortium for Ocean Leadership and a member of the National Science Board. Dr. Abbott was also a member of the NRC’s Space Studies Board and chaired its Committee on Earth Studies. Other prior NRC includes serving on the Committee on Indicators for Understanding Global Climate Change, the Committee on the Role and Scope of Mission-Enabling Activities in NASA’s Space and Earth Sciences Missions, and the Panel on Land-Use Change, Ecosystem Dynamics, and Biodiversity for the 2007 decadal survey on Earth science and applications from space.

Dr. Stacey Boland
Jet Propulsion Laboratory

STACEY W. BOLAND is a senior systems engineer at JPL working in Earth Mission Concepts. Dr. Boland’s primary areas of research include atmospheric sciences, remote sensing, and data systems. She is a cross-disciplinary generalist specializing in Earth-mission concept development and systems engineering and mission architecture development for advanced (future) Earth observing mission concepts, which involves a variety of remote sensing instruments applicable to a number of scientific fields, particularly atmospheric science. Dr. Boland received her B.S. in physics from the University of Texas, Dallas, and her M.S. and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from California Institute of Technology. She recently completed membership on the NRC Committee on Assessment of Impediments to Interagency Cooperation on Space and Earth Science Missions.


Dr. Antonio J. Busalacchi, Jr.
University of Maryland, College Park

ANTONIO J. BUSALACCHI, JR., is director of the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center and professor in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science at the University of Maryland. His research interests include tropical ocean circulation and its role in the coupled climate system and climate variability and predictability. Dr. Busalacchi has been involved in the activities of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) for many years and currently is chair of the Joint Scientific Committee that oversees the WCRP. He previously was co-chair of the scientific steering group for its subprogram on Climate Variability and Predictability. Dr. Busalacchi received a B.S. in physics from Florida State University, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in oceanography from Florida State University. He has served extensively on NRC activities, including as chair of the Climate Research Committee and Committee on a Strategy to Mitigate the Impact of Sensor Descopes and Demanifests on the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System and Geostationalry Operational Environmental Satellite Spacecraft, and as a member of the Committee on Earth Studies, the Panel on the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Program, and the Panel on Ocean Atmosphere Observations Supporting Short-Term Climate Predictions. Dr. Busalacchi currently serves as chair of the NRC’s Board on Atmospheric Sciences, and is co-chair of the Committee on National Security Implications of Climate Change on U.S. Naval Forces, and recently completed service on the Committee on Assessment of Impediments to Interagency Cooperation on Space and Earth Science Missions, and the Committee on the Effect of Climate Change on Indoor Air Quality and Public Health.

Dr. Lee-Lueng Fu
Jet Propulsion Laboratory

LEE-LEUNG FU is a JPL Fellow and Senior Research Scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. He has been the Project Scientist for JPL’s satellite altimetry missions since 1988, including TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason, and Ocean Surface Topography Mission/Jason-2. He is currently the Project Scientist for the US/France joint Surface Water and Ocean Topography Mission (SWOT), which is being developed as the next generation altimetry mission for measuring water elevation on Earth. Dr. Fu's research has been focused on the dynamics of ocean waves and currents ranging from small-scale internal gravity waves to ocean basin-scale circulation. He received a B.S. degree in Physics from National Taiwan University (1972) and a Ph.D. in Oceanography from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (1980). He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering, and a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union and the American Meteorological Society. Recently he was awarded the COSPAR International Cooperation Medal for his leadership in the development and continuation of satellite altimetry missions.

Prof. Dennis P. Lettenmaier
University of Washington

DENNIS P. LETTENMAIER (NAE) is the Robert and Irene Sylvester Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the head of the Surface Water Hydrology Research Group at the University of Washington. Dr. Lettenmaier’s interests cover hydroclimatology, surface water hydrology, and GIS and remote sensing. He was a recipient of American Society of Civil Engineers’s Huber Research Prize in 1990, is a fellow of the AGU, AAAS and the AMS, and is the author of more than 200 journal articles. He was the founding chief editor of the AMS Journal of Hydrometeorology and the president of the AGU Hydrology Section. He is a member of the International Water Academy and the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Lettenmaier received a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Washington, a M.S. in civil, mechanical and environmental engineering from The George Washington University, and a Ph.D. in civil engineering from the University of Washington. He has previously served as a member on numerous NRC committees, including Committee on Hydrologic Science: Studies of Strategic Issues in Hydrology, the survey committee for the 2007 decadal survey on Earth science and applications from space, and most recently the Committee on Stabilization Targets for Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Concentrations.


Mr. William F. Townsend
Independent Consultant

WILLIAM F. TOWNSEND is an independent aerospace consultant and a part time advisor with Stellar Solutions, Inc. He is also co-owner of Townsend Aerospace Consulting, LLC. Previously, Mr. Townsend worked at Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation. Mr. Townsend joined Ball in 2004 as the vice president and general manager of the Civil Space Systems Strategic Business Unit; his concluding position in 2008 was vice president of exploration systems. Mr. Townsend had a long career at NASA prior to his appointment at Ball. At Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) he was deputy center director where he oversaw the development, launch, and operation of all GSFC instruments, spacecraft, and missions, and was closely involved with almost 60 missions during his NASA career, including more than 30 missions while at GSFC. At NASA Headquarters, in the Earth Science Enterprise area, he held the positions of acting associate administrator, deputy associate administrator, deputy division director, and flight program branch chief and was program manager of the TOPEX/Poseidon, NASA Scatterometer, and Radarsat programs (all international). At the NASA Wallops Flight Center, Mr. Townsend served as the SeaSat Radar Altimeter Experiment manager, aerospace technologist, and electronic technician apprentice. He holds a BSEE with honors from Virginia Tech. He is the recipient of two presidential rank, meritorious executive awards, two NASA Distinguished Service Medals, the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal, the GSFC Robert C. Baumann Memorial Award for Mission Success, the NASA Exceptional Service Medal, and the French Space Agency’s Bronze Medal. Mr. Townsend served on the NRC’s Committee on Cost Growth in NASA Earth and Space Science Missions.

Dr. Richard A. Anthes
University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

RICHARD A. ANTHES is president of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) in Boulder, Colorado. His research has focused on the understanding of tropical cyclones and mesoscale meteorology and on the radio occultation technique for sounding Earth’s atmosphere. Dr. Anthes is a fellow of the AMS, receiving the AMS Clarence I. Meisinger Award and the Jule G. Charney Award and also serving as president of the AMS in 2007. Dr Anthes is a fellow of the AGU, as well. In 2003, he was awarded the Friendship Award by the Chinese government, the most prestigious award given to foreigners, for his contributions to atmospheric sciences and weather forecasting in China, and is also currently a member of the Global Position System (GPS) Scientific Application Research Center based out of Taiwan’s National Central University. Dr. Anthes received a B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in meteorology from the University of Wisconsin System. Prior NRC service includes chairing the National Weather Service Modernization Committee from 1996 to 1999 the Committee on NASA-NOAA Transition of Research to Operations in 2002-2003, and co-chairing the survey committee for the 2007 decadal survey on Earth science and applications from space. He was a member of the Space Studies Board’s Committee on Earth Studies until 2010.

Dr. Philip E. Ardanuy
Raytheon Information Solutions

PHILIP E. ARDANUY is chief scientist and director for Remote Sensing Applications at Raytheon Information Solutions. Dr. Ardanuy has 31 years of professional experience participating in NOAA, NASA, NSF, and DOD environmental applications programs. He specializes in developing integrated mission concepts through government-industry-academic partnerships. Dr. Ardanuy’s research and development career extends across net-centric and system-of-systems concepts, telepresence-telescience-telerobotics, tropical meteorology, the Earth’s radiation budget and climate, satellite instrument calibration and characterization, remote sensing applications and systems engineering, scientific applications research-to-operational transition, and validation of environmental observations. Dr. Ardanuy is currently a member of the NRC Instruments and Computing Panel of the NASA Technology Roadmap study. His prior NRC service includes serving as a member of the NRC Committee on a Strategy to Mitigate the Impact of Sensor De-scopes and De-manifests on the NPOESS and GOES-R Spacecraft. He also served on the NRC Committee on Environmental Satellite Data Utilization and on the Panel on Earth Science Applications and Societal Benefits for the 2007 decadal survey on Earth science and applications from space, and the Panel on Options to Ensure the Climate Record from the NPOESS and GOES-R Spacecraft.

Dr. Anny Cazenave
Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES)

ANNY CAZENAVE (NAS) is a senior scientist at the Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES) and deputy director of the Laboratory for Space Studies in Geophysics and Oceanography. Dr. Cazenave’s major areas of research focus on the application of satellite geodesy to climate change, sea level variation, and large-scale continental hydrology. She is a member of the Global Geodetic Observing System scientific panel and lead author on IPCC Working Group I for Ocean Climate and Sea-level. She is past president of the Geodesy Section of the European Geophysical Union (EGU) and was its Vening-Meinesz Medallist in 1999. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the French Academy of Sciences, the Academia Europaea, the Académie de l’Air et de l’Espace, and a fellow of the AGU. Her honors include Officier de l’Ordre National du Mérite and Chevalier de la Légion d’Honneur. Dr. Cazenave received her Ph.D. in geophysics from the University of Toulouse. Prior NRC service includes membership on the Committee on National Requirements for Precision Geodetic Infrastructure, the Panel on Water Resources and the Global Hydrologic Cycle for the 2007 decadal survey on Earth science and applications from space, and the Committee to Review NASA’s Solid Earth Science Strategy.

Dr. Ruth S. DeFries
Columbia University

RUTH S. DEFRIES (NAS) is the Denning Professor of Sustainable Development at Columbia University. Before joining Columbia University, Dr. DeFries was a professor at the University of Maryland, where she held joint appointments in the Department of Geography and the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center. Her research investigates the relationships between human activities, the land surface, and the biophysical and biogeochemical processes that regulate Earth’s habitability. She is interested in observing land-cover and land-use change on regional and global scales with remotely sensed data and exploring the implications for ecological services, such as climate regulation, the carbon cycle, and biodiversity. Dr. DeFries received a B.A. in earth science from Washington University in St. Louis, and a Ph.D. in geography and environmental engineering from Johns Hopkins University. She is a fellow of the AGU and the AAAS. Prior NRC experience includes serving as a chair of the NRC Committee on Earth System Science for Decisions about Human Welfare: Contributions of Remote Sensing, as a member of the Geographical Sciences Committee, and as a member of the survey committee for the 2007 decadal survey on Earth science and applications from space. She is currently a member of the Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences Editorial Board, and the NRC Committee on Climate, Energy, and National Security.

Dr. Bradford H. Hager
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

BRADFORD H. HAGER is the Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Earth Sciences and associate department head of the Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Dr. Hager is an expert in using precise measurements of ground deformation derived from GPS (Global Positioning System) observations and laser ranging, as well as Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar measurements to study earthquakes, seismic hazards, hydrocarbon reservoir mechanics, and underground CO2 storage. While teaching at the California Institute of Technology, Dr. Hager began the GPS field experiment that led to the discovery of rapid strain accumulation in the epicentral region of the 1994 Northridge Earthquake. He has been involved in other similar field projects around the world, including the Tien Shan Mountains of central Asia and the Southern Alps in New Zealand. Dr. Hager was co-chair of NASA’s DESDynI Science Study Group, a satellite mission to measure deformation of the land surface and ice sheets, as well as changes in terrestrial biomass. He is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Hager received a B.A. in physics from Amherst College, an M.A. in geology from Harvard University, and his Ph.D. in geophysics from Harvard University. He has previously served on the NRC Survey Steering Committee for Earth Science and Applications from Space: A Community Assessment and Strategy for the Future, the Panel on Solid-Earth Hazards, Resources and Dynamics, the Committee to Review NASA’s Solid Earth Science Strategy, and the Committee for Review of the Science Implementation Plan of the NASA Office of Earth Science.

Dr. Hung-Lung Allen Huang
University of Wisconsin-Madison

HUNG-LUNG ALLEN HUANG is a distinguished scientist of Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellites Studies (CIMSS) and the Space Science Engineering Center (SSEC) at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. While at CIMSS/SSEC, Dr. Huang has been conducting remote sensing research in the areas of atmospheric sounding retrieval, information content analysis, satellite and aircraft high-spectral resolution sounding instrument data processing, data compression, instrument design and performance analysis, cloud-clearing, cloud property characterization, synergistic imaging, and sounding data processing and algorithm development. Dr. Huang is also principal investigator of the NASA-funded International Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer/Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Instrument Processing project, the NOAA Integrated Program Office International Polar Orbiter Processing Package, the NASA Field Programmable Gate Array Re-Configurable Computation Demonstration project, and program manager and lead scientist of algorithm development for NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-R risk reduction project. He is a member of the International Society for Optical Engineering (SPIE), the AMS, the Optical Society of America, and the International Radiation Commission. Dr. Huang received a B.S. in atmospheric science from National Taiwan University and an M.S. and Ph.D. in meteorology from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. For the NRC, he served as chair of the Committee on Utilization of Environmental Satellite Data: A Vision for 2010 and Beyond and as a member of the Committee on Earth Studies.

Dr. Anthony C. Janetos
University of Maryland, College Park

ANTHONY C. JANETOS is director of the Joint Global Change Research Institute, part of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, with research-affiliate status at the University of Maryland. Earlier, he was a senior research fellow at the H. John Heinz III Center for Science, Economics, and the Environment. In 1999, he joined the World Resources Institute as senior vice president and chief of program. Previously, he served as senior scientist for the Land-Cover and Land-Use Change Program in NASA’s Office of Earth Science and was program scientist for the Landsat 7 mission. He had many years of experience in managing scientific research programs on a variety of ecologic and environmental topics, including air-pollution effects on forests, climate change impacts, land-use change, ecosystem modeling, and the global carbon cycle. Dr. Janetos received his B.S. in Biology from Harvard University, and his M.S. & Ph.D. in biology from Princeton University. He was a co-chair of the U.S. National Assessment of the Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Change and an author of Land-Use, Land-Use Change, and Forestry (an IPCC special report) and Global Biodiversity Assessment. Prior NRC experience includes serving on the survey committee for for the 2007 decadal survey on Earth science and applications from space, the Committee on Ecological Impacts of Climate Change, and the Climate Research Committee. Dr. Janetos is currently a member of the Committee on Socioeconomic Scenarios for Climate Change Impact and Response Assessments, and the Space Studies Board.

Dr. Jennifer A. Logan
Harvard University

JENNIFER A. LOGAN is senior research fellow in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University. Dr. Logan’s research focuses on boreal fires, climate change, analysis of satellite observations on tropospheric ozone, and development and analysis of the Global Modeling Initiative Model. She is also a member of the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer mission team based out of JPL. Dr. Logan is a fellow of the AGU and the AAAS. She was also a coauthor of the 2002 and 2006 World Meteorological Organization/UN Environment Programme Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion report, and a contributor and reviewer of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report on Aviation and the Global Atmosphere in 1999. Prior NRC services includes membership on the Committee on the Role and Scope of Mission-Enabling Activities in NASA’s Space and Earth Science Mission, the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, and the Committee to Assess the North American Research Strategy for Tropospheric Ozone (NARSTO) Program.

Dr. Molly K. Macauley
Resources for the Future

MOLLY K. MACAULEY is research director and a senior fellow with Resources for the Future (RFF) where she has also served as director of academic programs. Dr. Macauley’s research at RFF has covered studies on economics and policy issues of outer space, the valuation of non-priced space resources, the design of incentive arrangements to improve space resource use, and the appropriate relationship between public and private endeavors in space research, development, and commercial enterprise. Dr. Macauley serves as a visiting professor in the Department of Economics at Johns Hopkins University and has previously served in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public Affairs at Princeton University. She has frequently testified before Congress and serves on many national-level committees and panels. Dr. Macauley earned her B.A. in economics from the College of William and Mary and her M.S. and Ph.D. in economics from Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Macauley is currently a member of the NRC Space Studies Board and is also serving on the Committee on the Assessment of NASA’s Orbital Debris Programs. Prior NRC service includes being a member of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board and serving on the Panel on Earth Science Applications and Societal Benefits for the 2007 decadal survey on Earth science and applications from space.


Dr. Anne W. Nolin
Oregon State University

ANNE W. NOLIN is a professor of remote sensing and physical geography at Oregon State University (OSU). Prior to her appointment at OSU, Dr. Nolin was a research scientist at the National Snow and Ice Data Center, part of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Her research interests include snow hydrology, polar climatology, the martian polar ice caps, and remote sensing of snow and ice from airborne and space-borne sensors. She specializes in mountain hydroclimatology, snow and ice in the climate system, and remote sensing. She is currently a member of the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) Science Team and was a NASA principal investigator for the validation of snow albedo retrievals from MISR and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer). She received a B.A. from the University of Arizona in anthropology, an M.S. from U. of Arizona in soil science, and a Ph.D. in physical geography from the University of California at Berkeley. Dr. Nolin served as vice chair of the NRC Panel on Water Resources and the Global Hydrologic Cycle for the study, “Earth Science and Applications from Space: A Community Assessment and Strategy for the Future,” was a member of the Committee on a Strategy to Mitigate the Impact of Sensor De-scopes and De-manifests on the NPOESS and GOES-R Spacecraft, and was also a member of the Committee on Earth Studies of the Space Studies Board.



Dr. Joyce E. Penner
University of Michigan

JOYCE E. PENNER is the Ralph J. Cicerone Distinguished University Professor of Atmospheric Science and director of the Laboratory for Atmospheric Science and Environmental Research at the University of Michigan. Dr. Penner’s research focuses on improving climate models through the addition of interactive chemistry and the description of aerosols and their direct and indirect effects on the radiation balance in climate models. She is also interested in urban, regional, and global tropospheric chemistry and budgets, cloud and aerosol interactions and cloud microphysics, climate and climate change, model development and interpretation. Dr. Penner has been a member of numerous advisory committees related to atmospheric chemistry, global change, and Earth science, including the United Nation’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and, consequently, a co-winner of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. She was the coordinating lead author for IPCC (2001) Chapter 5 on aerosols. Dr. Penner received a B.A. in applied mathematics from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and her M.S. and Ph.D. in applied mathematics from Harvard University. She is currently a member of the NRC U.S. National Committee for the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics. Prior NRC service includes being a member of the Space Studies Board, the planning committee for the Workshop on Uncertainty Management in Remote Sensing of Climate Data, and Panel on Climate Variability and Change for the 2007 decadal survey on Earth science and applications from space.

Dr. Michael J. Prather
University of California, Irvine

MICHAEL J. PRATHER is the Fred Kavli Chair and Professor in the Department of Earth System Science at the University of California, Irvine. Dr. Prather research focuses on the simulation of the physical, chemical, and biological processes that determine atmospheric composition; development of detailed numerical models of photochemistry and atmospheric radiation; and global chemical transport models that describe ozone and other trace gases. As a member of the International Ozone Commission, Dr. Prather participated in key United Nations’ environmental efforts. He has regularly addressed both government and business groups and is a scientific participant in major global environmental summits. Prior to joining the UC Irvine faculty, Dr. Prather directed research at Harvard University and the Goddard Institute for Space Studies. A fellow of the AGU and a member of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, he served from 1997 through 2001 as editor-in-chief of Geophysical Research Letters. He received a B.A. in mathematics from Yale University, a B.A. in physics from the University of Oxford, and a Ph.D. in astronomy and astrophysics from Yale University. Dr. Prather has served on numerous NRC committees, including the Committee on Methods for Estimating Greenhouse Gas Emissions, the Panel on Climate Variability and Change of the 2007 decadal survey on Earth science and applications from space, and the Committee for Review of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program Strategic Plan.

Dr. David S. Schimel
National Ecological Observatory Network, Inc.

DAVID S. SCHIMEL is the chief executive officer of the National Ecological Observatory Network, Inc. He was formerly the senior scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Colorado, Director of the Max Planck Institut fur Biogeochimie in Jena, Germany, and a senior scientist of the Natural Resources and Ecology Laboratory at Colorado State University. His areas of scientific interests are in biogeochemistry, atmosphere-biosphere exchange, and carbon cycle and climate impacts. Dr. Schimel shared in the Nobel Peace Prize that was awarded in 2007 to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Report, and is editor in chief of Ecological Applications for the Ecological Society of America. He received his Ph.D. in ecology from Colorado State University. Dr. Schimel served on the NRC’s Panel on Land-Use Change, Ecosystem Dynamics, and Biodiversity for the 2007 decadal survey on Earth science and applications from space. He also served on the Committee on Geophysical and Environmental Data, among others.

Dr. Thomas H. Vonder Haar
Colorado State University

THOMAS H. VONDER HAAR (NAE) is Emeritus director of the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) and University Distinguished Professor of Atmospheric Science at Colorado State University. His research included work on Earth’s radiation budget and fundamental relationships with the climate system and incorporated some of the first results of direct solar irradiance measurements from satellites and the exchange of energy between Earth and space. His studies on the interaction of clouds, water vapor and radiation and the general circulation formed a basis for national and international plans leading to the Global Energy and Water Experiment and other programs related to global change. In 1980, Dr. Vonder Haar spearheaded the formation of CIRA, a center for international cooperation in research and training, covering virtually all physical, economic and societal aspects of weather and climate. CIRA was established to increase the effectiveness of atmospheric research in areas of mutual interest between Colorado. Dr. Vonder Haar has also served as director of the Center for Geosciences, a Department of Defense sponsored research center that focuses on the study of weather patterns and how they affect military operations including investigations of fog, cloud layering, cloud drift winds and dynamics of cloud persistence as detected from satellites. He received his B.S. in aeronautics from St. Louis University, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in meteorology from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Dr. Vonder Haar currently serves on the NRC’s Special Fields and Interdisciplinary Engineering Peer Committee. Prior NRC service includes serving as a member of the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, the Panel on Options to Ensure the Climate Record from the NPOESS and GOES-R Spacecraft, and the Panel on Weather Sciences and Applications for the 2007 decadal survey on Earth science and applications from space.

Committee Membership Roster Comments
Added Bradford Hager to the roster 04/26/2011. Updated bio for Lee-Leung Fu 04/2/12.